Spiders have a bad reputation!  Maybe it’s the eight legs, the webs they weave, or even the way they capture and eat their prey.  What people don’t usually realize is that humans are rarely the intended prey of spiders. In fact,  80% of “spider bites” aren’t actually from spiders at all.  Most spiders are too small to bite into humans and when you do get a spider bite, their venom is too weak to be a danger.

Spiders can bite when they feel threatened but lots of times it is purely by accident.  There are two spiders in the US that cause concern when it comes to biting: brown recluse spiders and black widow spiders.

 

Brown Recluse Spider

Brown Recluse

 

 

 

 

 

 

So what should you do if you have been bitten by a spider?

If possible, capture the spider.  By capturing the spider you can bring it into your local pest control company or doctor so they can identify the species.  Applying a cold compress to the site of the bite will help to reduce any inflammation.  Elevate the body part where the spider has bitten.  If you start to experience symptoms such as dizziness, shortness of breath, or headaches seek immediate medical attention.