Hollywood Invasion

Throughout history, most humans have disliked and even had a fear of insects and spiders. Entomophobia, or insectophobia, is a common fear or aversion to insects and arthropods. Arachnophobia is the fear of spiders. Hollywood has capitalized on those common fears by exposing them in the horror film genre.

Since the horror genre hit the scene back in the 1940’s, the bug movie has been a pivotal part of the industry. The insect horror film is in an exceptionally extensive category of horror. Since the premiere of 1950’s Highly Dangerous, Hollywood has produced over 75 movies featuring killer insects or spiders. Some contain mammoth, mutant bugs that can devour humans, while others feature deadly swarms of ants, bees, or wasps. They vary from the hilariously campy to the straight -up terrifying.  Here are a few:

Them! – A crew of FBI agents and entomologists battle radiation-induced gigantic ants in this black-and-white sci-fi flick from 1954.

The Fly – Jeff Goldblum’s iconic turn as the scientist-turned-fly in this remake is equal parts poignant and petrifying.

The Deadly Mantis – The star of William Alland’s sci-fi flick is a 200-foot-long praying mantis freed from its prehistoric lair by a sudden seismic shift.

Arachnophobia – South American killer spider hitches a lift to the US in a coffin and starts to breed and kill.

Not all movies about bugs tap into our fears.  Here are movies that make you almost wanna like the little guys:

A Bug’s Life – A misfit ant, looking for “warriors” to save his colony from greedy grasshoppers, recruits a group of bugs that turn out to be an inept circus troupe.

Spiderman – When bitten by a genetically modified spider, a nerdy, shy, and awkward high school student gains spider-like abilities that he eventually must use to fight evil as a superhero after tragedy befalls his family.

 

Don’t let your home turn into a horror film! Call Northwest Exterminating.

What is the creepiest movie that you have ever seen?

Cara Carver
ccarver@callnorthwest.com

Northwest Exterminating
830 Kennesaw Ave MariettaGA30060 USA 
 • 888-466-7849
 

How to Prevent Millipedes from Getting into Your Home

MillipedesDid you know that a millipede isn’t an insect at all?!  They are arthropods that feed on dead and decaying plant matter.  Millipedes overwinter in homes which means they enter when the temperatures drop and come out when the temperatures rise.  This is why you see millipedes around your home in warmer months…they’ve been there; they’ve just been “resting”.  Well, they’re not always “resting”, sometimes they are mating which can be a pain because they can lay up to 300 eggs at a time.  This is usually when you discover a millipede infestation.  In the right situation, a millipede can live 5-7 years.

The best way to keep millipedes out of your house is to stop them from getting in.

Prevention Tips for millipedes:

  • Seal any cracks and/or crevices in the foundation, around wiring, and plumbing where millipedes, or other pests, could enter.
  • Millipedes require high humidity.  Use dehumidifiers to keep the air dry or use fans in rooms that done have good air flow.
  • Repair any leaks.  Leaky faucets or pipes can attract millipedes.
  • Clean out and remove debris from gutters.  Gutter build up can cause water from draining correctly.
  • Keep your yard clean by removing dead plant matter.  Remove piled up mulch or woodpiles that store moisture and attract millipedes.

Call Northwest Exterminating if you are having a millipede problem.

For more information on millipedes visit out Identify your Pest section.

 

Mound Ants & Their Mounds

The allegheny mound ant is a common ant found outdoors.   They feed on small insects or arthropods that are found outside so they rarely have a need to make their way into a structure…but that doesn’t mean you will never find them inside.

Identification:

  • 1/4″ long
  • red bodies and black abdomen
  • most often identified by the large mound that they build

The Mound:

The allegheny mound ant is known for the large mounds that they build.  This is the easiest way to identify the species.  Their mounds are made up of built up soil that can go up to 4 feet above soil and extend 3 feet deep into the ground.  A 5 month old mound can be about 2 feet wide and 8 inches tall.  A two year old mound can be up to 3 feet tall.  These large mounds are mostly found in unkept grassy areas, pastures, nurseries, and turf.

Allegheny mound ants produce formic acid that can damage bushes, plants, and gardens.  Formic acid can kill small trees and shrubs within 40-50 feet of a mound and the grass of your lawn that is located around a mound.  Most new mounds are made in late May and early June.  This can cause issues if you spend time in your lawn because the mound ants will bite if they feel like their colony is being disturbed.

Protect yourself and your lawn by hiring a professional exterminator that can eliminate ants around your home and prevent damage and harmful bites.  Call Northwest Exterminating to get rid of your ant problems.

 

 

 

 

iPest app

We’ve recently discovered a useful tool that has helped us both inside and outside of the office.  iPest is a mobile app that is beneficial not only for pest control technicians but homeowners, building managers, etc.  The iPest app is a guide that was developed by researchers at the University of Florida.  The app is a great tool to identify and educate yourself on common pests that are found in and around homes and businesses.  iPest contains 3 series, a search tool, and color photos that can help you quickly find a particular pest.

Series:

iPest1cockroaches, flies, occasional invaders, and urban pest and wildlife droppings. 

iPest2ants, beetles, termites and wood destroying insects.

iPest3 – biting, stinging, and bloodsucking arthropods

This app has been a great tool in and outside of the office and we think it would be great for our customers as well.

Go to you app store and purchase iPest for $1.99

 

5 Bugs to Love

Valentine’s Day is a day of LOVE!  Bugs aren’t something that we usually “love” but in the spirit of the holiday, here are 5 bugs to love!

  1. Ladybugs are not only one of the cuter bugs out there but they are beneficial because they eat large quantities of aphids, mites and other arthropods that feed on various plants in your yard or garden. Imported more than 100 years ago to defend orchards and orange groves, ladybugs can eat up to 5,000 pests in their lifetime.
  2. Earthworms are nature’s most efficient composters.  These scavengers create the kind of well-aerated, humus-rich soil gardeners call “black gold.”
  3. The love bug is also known as the honeymoon fly, kissing bug, or double-headed bug.  The adult is a small, flying insect common to the southeastern United States, especially along the Gulf Coast.  During and after mating, adult pairs remain coupled, even in flight, for up to several days.
  4. The praying mantis is named for the “praying” position that it often assumes.  This insect will eat just about any living thing it can fit in its mouth, helpful or not. It is known to consume mosquitoes, nocturnal moths, bees, beetles, small lizards, even frogs—as well as fellow praying mantises.
  5. Bumblebees collect nectar and the pollen that will make tomato plants and apple trees produce more fruit.  The female bumblebee can sting but they much prefer to stick to gentler business.