Dr. Goo’s Corner: Wildlife and Rabies

Wildlife ControlWith cooler weather moving in it is the time of year where wildlife such as squirrels, rodents, raccoons, etc, begin to take refuge in your home.  Animal control is important for the health of your home.  Rodents make for unsanitary conditions by urinating, leaving droppings, chewing on wires, insulation, and other items in the attic, and can often carry disease.  Some rodents can be dangerous and will attack if they feel that they or their young are in danger.

A common concern for wildlife is the threat of rabies.  Rabies is a serious illness so we went to our health expert, Dr. Goo.  Below, Dr. Goo talks about the risk rabies:

Rabies is a viral illness that can cause death and serious illness if untreated. If treated quickly and appropriately almost everyone can be cured of rabies.

The most important way to avoid rabies is to not be bitten or exposed to animals that potentially may have the rabies virus.

The most common animal exposures to rabies are from wild animals. Bats, raccoons, skunks, foxes and coyotes are the primary animals that carry rabies in the United States.

Pets can be protected from rabies by getting their rabies shots annually.  Domestic animals rarely transmit rabies.

If you think you may have been exposed or bitten by an animal that has rabies you should call the Georgia Poison Center at 1-800-222-1222.  You should also notify your doctor.

Remember, prevention and avoidance are the best defense against rabies.

Northwest Exterminating offers Wildlife Control for you and your family. The Wildlife Services Team specializes in the exclusion, removal, and control of wildlife nuisances like bats, raccoons, skunks, foxes and coyotes – the most common causes of rabies exposure.

For more detailed information about rabies exposure, treatment, prevention, and protection, please visit the Center for Disease Control and the Georgia Poison Center.

Dr. Goo
Northwest Exterminating
830 Kennesaw Ave MariettaGA30060 USA 
 • 888-466-7849
 

Dr. Goo’s Corner: What to do for an itchy hornet sting?

Dr. Goo,  My husband got stung by a hornet this weekend and now it is itchy.  What should we do?

For an itchy hornet or other insect sting:Apply a paste of baking soda and water as soon as possible after being stung.  This will help to relive the pain.  If the stinger is left in the skin, gently remove it using tweezers.   Otherwise, you can use a combination of benadryl gel or cream (diphenhydramine) topically and/or a steroid cream (hydrocortisone 1%) which are both over the counter.   If it is really itchy you can take some oral benadryl (25mg) but that tends to make people sleepy. Keep the area clean by washing it twice daily with soap and water and seek medical care if it looks like it is getting infected.

Hope it gets better soon!

Dr. Goo



 
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Disclaimer: These tips are general medical information and do not constitute medical advice. Please contact your physician for information about yourself or your family member.

 

Dr. Goo’s Corner: How Do I know If I’m Allergic to Mosquitoes and What To Do If I Am?

Disclaimer: These tips are general medical information and do not constitute medical advice. Please contact your physician for information about yourself or your family member.

How do I know if I, or my child, has an allergy to mosquitoes?

Usually people who ask this question already suspect they have an allergy to mosquito bites.  When they get bitten they get large swollen bumps that are red, itchy and painful.  These bumps tend to last longer than mosquito bites for other people and they cause more discomfort.  The reaction may not be classified as a true “allergy” but the problem is a larger release of histamine and other immunoglobulins that cause inflammation.

These people have a more severe reaction to the proteins that mosquitoes inject into the bite to keep the blood from clotting. The reaction is usually a large red whelp that itches, swells and is very uncomfortable. Although these bites are very irritating, it is rare to have a serious allergic reaction to a mosquito bite. Life threatening reactions would include difficulty breathing, low blood pressure, fainting or swelling all over.

If you or your child has a more severe reaction to mosquito bites than others, you may have what is known as the “Skeeter Syndrome.”  People that have the “Skeeter Syndrome” have more severe reactions and will have larger, itchier and more painful bumps associated with the bites.  The bites can also cause blisters and be associated with infections if the bites are scratched until they are open and bleeding.  True mosquito allergies can be diagnosed with allergy testing.

What to do if you are allergic?

The first thing to do is to avoid the mosquito bites in the first place. Have Northwest Exterminating, or your local exterminator, provide your home with a mosquito treatment.  Also, cover your body when you go out and use an insect repellent, such as DEET.

If you do get bitten, you can use an anti-histamine like Diphenhydramine (Benadryl) for the itching.  You can take the anti-histamine by mouth or use preparations that can be placed topically on the bite.  Anti-inflammatory creams like hydrocortisone may also be used. If the bite is scratched open, you will want to wash it daily and apply an antibiotic ointment to keep them from being infected.

If you have severe allergic symptoms like respiratory distress, swelling of the body, face, mouth or throat you will need to go directly to the emergency department.

Thanks,
Dr. Goo

 

 

 

 

 

Do you have a question for Dr. Goo?  Click HERE to submit your question.

 

Dr. Goo’s Corner: How to Survive the High Pollen Counts

Disclaimer: These tips are general medical information and do not constitute medical advice. Please contact your physician for information about yourself or your family member.

Spring has arrived and brought pollen with it.  Yesterday’s pollen count is the highest ever recorded in Atlanta for that date.  According to Atlanta Allergy and Asthma Clinic, the record number was 9369 per cubic meter.

If you have springtime allergies you are probably having a tough time right now due to the extremely high pollen counts.  Even people who do not normally have allergies can be having some difficulties with the pollen.

Symptoms include:

  • Eyes: Itchy, runny, swollen eyes
  • Nose: Stuffy or congested nose, clear or colored nasal discharge, sneezing or itchy nose, post nasal drainage
  • Throat: Sore or itchy throat
  • Lungs: Coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath
  • Skin: Increased itching, scratching of the skin and a possible flare of eczema, atopic dermatitis or other skin conditions.

Tips To Avoid Pollen:

  • Stay indoors and avoid outdoor activity, especially in the yard.
  • Run your air conditioner in your home and change your air filter regularly.
  • Keep your windows closed for now.
  • Vacuum at least twice a week. Empty the bag and change the filters regularly.
  • Dust or clean any visible pollen from your house.
  • Wash your hands, hair, body, and clothes when you come in from the outside.
  • Remove your shoes and jackets at the door.
  • Wash off pets if they have been running and playing in the yard.
  • Keep your car windows and sunroof closed and run the air conditioner on re-circulate to avoid bringing in air from the outside.
  • Consider an air purifier if you have very bad symptoms.  Put it in the room where you sleep and shut the door to keep pollen from entering.
  • Remove any unnecessary carpets or objects that collect pollen and dust from your room during this time.
  • Avoid outdoor exercise when the pollen count is high because it may be harmful to your system. Even indoor exercise might be a problem if you have respiratory symptoms like wheezing or coughing so contact your physician before you exercise.

Treatment for Hay Fever Symptoms:

If you have a cough, wheezing or difficulty breathing, immediately call your doctor. For serious breathing problems call 911. You may be having a serious problem like an asthma attack.  Treatment may include breathing treatments or steroids. You will definitely need to see your doctor if you are concerned about your cough or breathing.

In general, anti-histamines (like diphenhydramine, loratadine, cetirizine, and fexofenadine) are the first thing many people try because they decrease the allergic response. There are multiple over the counter preparations that work pretty well, but oftentimes one works better for one individual than another, and some have less side effects, like sedation, than others. There are prescription medications as well that your doctor can prescribe to you.

Decongestants help by relieving the inflammation and congestion that comes with the allergic response.  Medications like pseudoephedrine and phenylephrine are available over the counter but can have serious side effects, so talk to your doctor or pharmacist before you begin taking them.

Steroids also decrease the inflammation related to allergies so they are used commonly if the anti-histamine or decongestants are not effective. Steroids are always prescribed by a physician or health care provider and cannot be obtained over the counter.

For itchy eyes (Allergic Conjunctivitis) there are many types of over the counter drops that work very well. One product has pheneramine (anti-histamine) and naphazoline (gets the red out). As with any medicine it can have side effects so contact your doctor if you are taking any other medications before you use it. Please discuss the treatment with your physician if you have any concerns.

Sneezing, runny nose, and congestion are symptoms of Allergic Rhinitis.  There are many different preparations for this as well starting with decongestants which dry up your nose. Other preparations are steroid nasal sprays and medicines that stabilize the allergic response.


Enjoy Spring, but be careful if you are having allergic symptoms and call your doctor for any medical advice.  CorrectMed Pediatrics can answer your questions and treat you if needed.

Thanks,

Dr. Goo

 

 

Welcome Dr. David Goo to the Northwest Family

As part of Northwest Exterminating’s mission to create healthier living and working environments we have teamed up with Dr. David Goo of CorrectMed Pediatrics.  Dr. Goo and Northwest Exterminating want to make sure that your family and your home are healthy.  Along the way, Dr. Goo will offer medical advice to our readers about things that can affect the health of you and your home when it comes to pest, rodents, and other nuisances.

Dr. Goo is the medical director and lead urgent care physician at CorrectMed Pediatrics.  He is a board certified pediatrician and is boarded in pediatric emergency and medicine.  After working in the emergency room for 25 years, Dr. Goo and his family felt that a better model of healthcare was needed.  With that in mind, CorrectMed Pediatrics was founded.  Click HERE for more information on Dr. Goo and CorrectMed Pediatrics.

Visit Dr. Goo’s Corner often for the latest blogs and tips from Dr. Goo!

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