Lawn Diseases

During this time of year, you may notice that your lawn isn’t as green as the grass on the other side. Have no fear, Northwest Lawn Care services can provide diagnostics to let you know what’s going on beneath the surface of your lawn. For the most part, the summer months can mean very green lush grass, but the same warm temperatures might permit infections in your lawn. Way may seem like an unfortunate eye sore to you, may be one or more lawn diseases interrupting your summer plans.

Brown patch

This is a very prevalent disease that may make you think your lawn isn’t getting enough water and treatment. In actuality, this results due to moist, hot weather or over-fertilized lawns. This is active when grass remains wet at temperatures between 80 to 90 degrees Fahrenheit. It’s important to improve aeration and drainage on such lawns by watering deeply and infrequently, mowing high and removing excess thatch.

Brown Patch

Brown Patch

Fairy Rings

Despite what their name suggests, fairy rings are not due to Tinkerbell and her friends dancing across your yard. Rather, patterns of circles of mushrooms or unusually lush grass are due to soil exhaust forcing nutrients to the outer edge of dying mycelium. Your only choice in this instance is to dig up the affected area and use lawn treatments in order to make this area less visible.

Fairy rings

Fairy rings

Summer patch

This disease grows as a result of a fungus that infects and destroys grass roots. It mostly affects gross growing in a sunny, hot lawn. The grass will begin as wilted, dark green and eventually turn straw brown. The most effective means eliminating this is using preventive measures that Northwest Lawn Care provides.

Summer patch

Summer patch

 

If you are interested in learning about more lawn diseases, please visit the link below. If there are any that you feel affect your lawn, please contact Northwest Lawn Care and schedule an appointment today!

Sources:

http://www.yardcare.com/restore/fighting-lawn-diseases/summer-lawn-diseases/

Northwest Exterminating
830 Kennesaw Ave MariettaGA30060 USA 
 • 888-466-7849
 

Pests That Affect Your Lawn

It’s summer time, so you and your family will likely spend a great deal more time outside enjoying the weather. However, your household won’t be the only ones wanting to take advantage of your lawn. Especially during the summertime, certain insects can cause damage or even kill your turfgrass. Signs of insect feeding include grass turning yellow or brown and eventually dying. This begins as small patches of grass but can eventually lead to widespread damage. It’s important to eliminate lawn damage using preventive measures and Northwest Lawn Care offers just that!

 

 

One pest in particular that you may be used to seeing is a white grub. These insects are the larvae stage of several species of masked chafer beetles. This said, if you spot beetles in your yard, you’re likely to have white grubs. They are small, white “C” shaped bugs with six legs. When these insects infest, they can destroy grass roots, which weakens the affected area. If ever you’ve been able to lift your grass easily from the ground, it’s likely to be due to these insects.

White GrubMasked chafer

Another common insect pest is the armyworm, which is actually the larva stage of a moth and is therefore, a caterpillar. Like all caterpillars, army worms like feed of plants, including all types of grass. They like to chew on leaves as well as the base of leaves, leaving irregular patches of grass. Once again, if you notice a fair amount of brown or gray moths in your yard, you’re likely to already have an armyworm problem.

Armyworm

Armyworm

Other common insect pests include billbugs, black turfgrass ataenius, fiery skipper, lawn moths, sod webworms and the southern chinch bug. Keep in mind that these pests are perfect treat for larger pests such moles, skunks and raccoons. If you feel like your lawn may be at risk, call the Northwest Lawn Care Team and they will meet your needs.

Sources:

http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn7476.html

http://www.diynetwork.com/outdoors/how-to-identify-common-lawn-pests/index.html

http://www.hort.uconn.edu/ipm/homegrnd/htms/13inslwn.htm

http://ento.psu.edu/extension/factsheets/white-grubs-lawns