April’s Pest of the Month – Carpenter Bees

carpenter bee-uga websiteCarpenter bees are often mistake for bumble bees because of their similarity in size and color.

Habits

  • Often found under decks or porch railings and under the eaves of a house.
  • Make nests by tunneling into wood.
  • Leave a trail of sawdust as they discard of the wood to build partitions within the tunnels.
  • Feed on plant nectar, not wood.

Threats

  • Homes with wooden decks, eaves, or other areas of exposed wood are likely targets for carpenter bee damage.
  • Males do not have stingers but can be aggressive to other bees, animals, or people near the nest.
  • Females can sting but rarely do unless they are agitated.

Prevention

  • Treat or paint all exposed wood surfaces.
  • Each nest hole should be treated individually if bees are inside.
  • Seal or paint nest holes if bees are not inside.

Other Pests to Look Out For:

For more information on carpenter bees you can visit our PEST ID page or call Northwest Exterminating at 888.466.7849.

 

Northwest Exterminating
830 Kennesaw Ave MariettaGA30060 USA 
 • 888-466-7849
 

More Information on the Stink Bug

We talked on Wednesday about the return of the stink bug. We had so many questions that we thought we would continue our conversation about these pesky pests.

Stink bug

You may have noticed these six legged creatures in and around your home lately. The brown marmorated stink bug, also simply known as the stink bug, originated in parts of Asia. It first showed up in the American mainland in parts of Pennsylvania. At some point, these insects migrated to all parts of the Southeast and have a penchant for fruits, vegetables and other plants.

Stink bugs get their names from a defense mechanism located under their bodies that is triggered when threatened by predators such as birds or lizards. Nevertheless, simply handling the bug, injuring it or attempting to move it can trigger it to release an odor.

Damage done by a stink bug to an apple

As the seasons change, these bugs tend to seek out people’s homes as overwintering shelter from September to the first half of October in order to go into a state of hibernation.  Adults can live anywhere from several months to a year. Typically, these bugs enter the home through cracks under or behind baseboards, around window and door trim, and around exhaust fans or lights in ceilings. Sealing these openings will prevent the insects from entering.

If you find that you are having trouble keeping these bugs at bay, call Northwest and our experienced technicians will provide you with a service that protects your homes, lawns and gardens. For the best – Call Northwest!

Melissa Brown
mbrown@callnorthwest.com