Keeping Mosquitoes Away!

Northwest Exterminating representative, Courtesy of AJC

Northwest Exterminating representative, Courtesy of AJC

Need tips on how to keep mosquitoes away?

  • Remove standing water from your yard.  These areas serve as breeding grounds for mosquitoes.
  • Keep screens on windows and doors to keep them out of your home.
  • Use an insect repellant.  DEET is highly recommended.  Be sure to read the label and reapply as necessary.
  • Cover up.  We know it’s hot but items like hats, long sleeve shirts, long pants, and shoes that cover your feet will help keep the mosquitoes from biting.
  • Wear light colors.  Mosquitoes are attracted to dark colors so keep it light and bright to keep them away.
  • Stay still.  Movement produces a change in waves of light and acts as a signal to mosquitoes.  Carbon dioxide is also an attractant, so the more you move, the harder you breathe and the more you attract mosquitoes.
  • Plants.  Certain strong smelling plants help keep mosquitoes away.  Citronella, marigolds, and lemongrass are some of the plants you can use outdoors, while rosemary and basil are said to be helpful inside.
  • Home remedies.  There is no shortage of DIY remedies online.  Some of these can be useful for short term effectiveness.
  • Professional pest management.  A trained pest control technician can inspect your property to identify what is attracting the mosquito infestation.  The technician can then treat your property in an earth friendly and effective manner.  They can also provide you with a plan to keep mosquitoes away.

These are just a few tips on keeping mosquitoes away.  Mosquitoes are known carriers of diseases like West Nile virus, encephalitis, and heartworms in dogs.  Make sure that you are protecting yourself and your loved ones.  For more information, visit our blog or call Northwest Exterminating at 888.466.7849.

Why Do Mosquitoes Love Me So Much?

 

Northwest Exterminating
830 Kennesaw Ave MariettaGA30060 USA 
 • 888-466-7849
 

Record Breaking Rain Brings Record Amount of Mosquitoes

Good news…we’re no longer in a drought!!

Bad news…thanks to all of the record breaking rain, we have record amounts of pests, especially mosquitoes!

mosquitoMoisture is known to attract pests.  They, like humans, need moisture to survive.  So it’s no surprise that with the large amount of rain we’ve gotten this year that mosquitoes have become a major issue for Georgia residents.

Georgia is no stranger to mosquitoes.  Between standing water (lakes, ponds, creeks, even standing water in your yard) and the local vegetation, we are accustomed to this issue.  While some residents turn to DIY options, those aren’t always effective. Going to the local hardware store and picking out a product from the shelves may help short term but will not get to the source of the mosquito infestation.

Northwest Exterminating’s Green Mosquito Control provides monthly mosquito treatments by a licensed professional.  Our professionals are knowledgeable about the products they are using, what attracts mosquitoes, and the process of keeping them away.  Our professional exterminators will inspect the property and identify the source of the breeding and nesting areas.  After they’ve determined these areas they are able to apply an environmentally friendly product derived from flowers and bacteria.

For tips on ways to reduce mosquitoes visit HERE.

For more information on Northwest Exterminating’s Green Mosquito Control call 888.466.7849 or visit us online at www.callnorthwest.com

 

 

Back to School? So is Lice!

School’s in session!

School is back in so inevitably it’s time to have “the talk”.  Ya know, the one we dread every year…the talk about LICE!  September is Lice Prevention Month but these days, with school starting in August, it’s best to have the conversation early!

Lice, tiny little wingless insects that make their home in human hair, spreads rapidly!  On the bright side, although creepy, they do not spread disease and are by most accounts not a danger to our health.  However, they are annoying and highly contagious.  They can cause itchiness, redness, and even slight inflammation.

What to Look For:

  • Nits.  Luckily, lice can be seen by thoroughly examining your child’s scalp.  Lice lay eggs (nits) that look like tiny dots that are yellow, tan, or brown in color.  They are laid on the scalp and can’t be removed by brushing or shaking the hair.  Nits take 1-2 weeks to hatch.
  • Adult lice.  Adult lice are a grayish color and about the size of a poppy seed.  It is more common to see nits than adult lice.
  • Scratching.  Scratching may not always occur right away.  A reaction is caused by the saliva of the lice after they bite which then can cause itching and scratching.
  • Rash or Redness.  A rash or redness can occur from irritation.  If excessive scratching occurs it can lead to a bacterial infection.

What to Do If You See Lice:

  • Alert your child’s school.  By letting your child’s school know they can inform other parents to check their children which will aid in stopping the spread of lice as quickly as possible.
  • Treat.  Use an over the counter shampoo, cream rinse, or lotion that is developed to kill lice.  Make sure to follow the directions.
  • Call your Doctor.  If OTC treatments aren’t working, contact your child’s doctor so they can recommend other options, even prescription medications.

Note: If your child is 2 years old or younger, contact your child’s Doctor before using any medicated lice treatments.

  • Remove by hand.  Another option is to remove the lice and nits by hand.  Using a fine-tooth comb, comb through your child’s wet, conditioned hair.  You should do this every day for 2 weeks after the last live lice is seen.
  • Wash and dry clothing.  Make sure to wash and dry clothing, sheets, hats,  and even backpacks that your child may have used while infected.  Use the hot cycle for washing and drying.
  • Replace combs/brushes.  Throw away any combs and brushes that may have been used while your child was infected with lice.  It is also recommended that you soak any hair accessories such as barrettes, hair ties, etc in rubbing alcohol or medicated shampoo.
  • Treat household.  Since lice is easily transferred to others make sure to inspect all family members.

Prevention:

  • Avoid sharing head items.  Examples: brushes, combs, hair accessories, helmets, hats, etc.
  • Check regularly.  Check head’s on a regular basis for nits and lice and treat at the first sign.

Additional Northwest Exterminating posts about lice:

http://www.callnorthwest.com/2011/09/school-has-started-so-has-lice/

http://www.callnorthwest.com/2011/09/september-is-head-lice-prevention-month/

 

Bees vs. Wasps

Bees and wasps are often confused for one another.  Although they both belong to the hymenoptera order and share similar features, they are different.  Below is a list of basic shared features, as well as a list of features that set them apart from one another.

Pictures courtesy of NPMA

Pictures courtesy of NPMA

Bees AND Wasps

  • two sets of wings
  • only females can sting
  • overwintering pests
  • narrow waist
  • larvae
  • can sting and inject venom
  • barb like pointers on stinger used to penetrate victim

Bees

  • some bees (honeybees) will die if stinger is pulled from bee, others will continue to live
  • round body
  • fuzzy appearance
  • feed on pollen and nectar

Wasps

  • do not leave their stingers behind
  • small barbs
  • slender and smooth body
  • no fuzz
  • preys on other insects and spiders

For bee and wasp removal, call our team at Northwest Exterminating!

 

August Pest of the Month: Ticks

It’s important to protect yourself and your pets from ticks this season!  Keep reading for more information on the little suckers!

tick

BRIEF DESCRIPTION

  • Size varies depending on the species and type.
  • More closely related to spiders than insects.
  • Can have either a soft or a hard body.
  • Usually brought into homes by animals.
  • Feed on animals and humans for their blood meal.

HABITS

  • Live in low lying areas such as grass, shrubs, and bushes while waiting for a passing host to attach themselves on to.
  • Female ticks have about 3,000 eggs in the spring time.
  • Ticks feed on humans, mice, squirrels, raccoons, skunks, dogs, and birds.

SPECIES

  • American dog tick
  • Blacklegged/deer/bear tick
  • Brown dog tick
  • Lone Star Tick
  • Rocky Mountain Wood Tick

THREATS

  • Ticks attach themselves to animals or humans to obtain their blood meal by biting the victim.
  • Can cause irritation around the site of the bite, allergic reaction, or cause the mouth parts to get stuck in the skin when the tick is removed.
  • Known to transfer Lyme disease, anaplasmosis, and babesiosis.

PREVENTION

  • When in wooded areas or tall grass, wear long pants, long sleeves, and closed toed shoes.
  • Use a bug repellant that contains DEET.
  • Keep grass and other vegetation on your property properly cut and maintained.
  • Inspect yourself for ticks after being outdoors.
  • Inspect your pets for ticks after being outdoors.
  • If you find a tick, use tweezers to remove the tick with a slow, gentle, upward pressure.

OTHER PESTS TO LOOK OUT FOR

Call Northwest Exterminating for information on how to protect your home and loved ones from ticks.

 

 

Strange Facts About Bugs

Besides being interesting to look at, there are many little known but fascinating facts about insects that make these pests something to marvel at. Perhaps one reason why it takes a skilled pest control company to totally eliminate insect pests is because of their general resilience. As we blogged about before, the notion that roaches can withstand nuclear warfare is true (to a degree). It should be of no surprise then that the larvae of one type of midge can survive for up to three days in liquid nitrogen. Since the temperature of liquid nitrogen is negative 321 degrees, that’s a pretty amazing feat. Now we know who survived the Ice Age!

Midge

 

Some humans have trouble finding a date and even resort to the Internet to search for love all over the world. Well, we’re not the only ones who can find a mate from a distance. Indian moon moths are able to smell the pheromones of a potential mate over 6 miles away! How’s that for a long distance relationship?

Indian Moon Moth

Another intriguing but devastating fact pertains to mosquitoes. For the most part, we are bothered by mosquitoes due to the pesky insect bites they leave. Red and itchy marks aren’t the only thing that mosquitoes can leave behind though. Often, mosquitoes transmit diseases to our blood, so devastating in fact that mosquitoes have killed more humans worldwide than all of the wars in history. If you want help fighting that enemy, Northwest Exterminating has a Mosquito Reduction program designed to keep mosquitoes away from the home front.

Mosquito

You can go to this link http://science.discovery.com/creatures/10-weird-bug-facts.htm
for more interesting bug facts.

 

Asian Tiger Mosquito

Asian Tiger Mosquito

 

If you are just now being able to absorb the menace of the Gallinipper mosquito, unfortunately you won’t be able to breathe easy just yet. Evidently, tourists aren’t the only people coming to our American shores this summer. The Asian tiger mosquito is named for the black-and-white stripes on its body.  You may think that spraying on some bug spray during the day time will help keep them at bay, but think again! This mosquito is different from others in that it bites all day long and pursues not only humans, but also dogs, cats, birds and other animals.

According to Livescience.com, entomology professor Dina Fonseca reports “Part of the reason it is called ‘tiger’ is also because it is very aggressive… you can try and swat it all you want, but once it’s on you, it doesn’t let go.” Another serious concern of this particular insect is that it spreads more than 20 diseases, including West Nile fever, dengue fever, yellow fever and two types of encephalitis.

Since the 1980s, the Asian tiger mosquito has reached 26 states, primarily in the eastern United States. Warm weather helps this pest get around, but its eggs are also capable of surviving cold weather. To help eliminate the potential destruction of this pest, it is important to remove standing water, wear insect repellent and wear long sleeves and pants outdoors. Naturally, Northwest Exterminating is equipped with preventive solutions to give you a mosquito-free summer. If you’re interested in our services, give us a call!

Sources:

http://www.livescience.com/37715-asian-tiger-mosquitoes-chikungunya.html

 

Daddy Long Legs vs Daddy Long Leg Spiders

Daddy Long legs or Daddy Long legs Spider?

harvestmanDaddy Long legs, or harvestmen, are not actually spiders.  Daddy long legs are not poisonous, have long legs and a large bulbous-looking body.  They feed on insects, which makes them helpful around the garden.  They are especially active at the time of harvest, toward the end of summer and beginning of fall.  To keep daddy long legs away, vacuum carpet, upholstery, and curtains frequently to remove spider webs, adult spiders, and egg sacs.  Be sure to dispose of the vacuum bag.  Tightly seal the trash bag to make sure eggs can’t hatch and crawl out of the bag.

Tip for preventing daddy long legs: Pour 1 cup white vinegar and 1/3 cup vanilla extract into a spray bottle and shake.  Spray areas where the daddy long legs have been spotted indoors and out.  The smell will repel the insects.

Daddy Long legs Spiders, or cellar spiders, although venomous, are not known to be harmful to humans.  Their fangs are short and they do not have enough muscle to be able to penetrate human skin.  Daddy long legs spiders are very fragile and delicate.  They are usually brown or gray in color, cylindrical in shape and their legs are very long and thin.  Daddy long legs spiders survive on others species of spiders, or on occasion they will invade other spiders’ webs and consume the host, their egg, and any prey caught in the web.  They hang upside down on their webs, which they create in dark, damp places like home cellars, caves or abandoned animal burrows.

Tip for preventing daddy long leg spiders: To keep daddy long legs spiders away you will need caulk, a vacuum cleaner, a duster, boric acid/Borax, and spider traps.  Caulk cracks in your walls, foundation, and loose window frames.  With a vacuum cleaner attachment, suck up spiders and their webs at wall corners, undersides of furniture, floors beneath appliances, crevices along the baseboards and around windows and curtains.  Insects attract daddy long legs spiders so dust frequently and repair leaking pipes and faucets both inside and out.  Sprinkle boric acid under doorways, around window sills, along baseboards, and under appliances.  Boric acid is a common ingredient in household cleaning products and is not harmful to humans and pets.  Place spider traps in areas where spiders are usually seen.

Barry Teubert
Northwest Exterminating
Savannah Service Center
bteubert@callnorthwest.com

 

Endangered Species and Pesticides

As a pest control company, Northwest Exterminating makes it a point to provide cleaner living and working environments. Furthermore, we do so by following federal and state guidelines, including the Endangered Species Act of 1973. The Endangered Species Act of 1973 provides legal protection for endangered and threatened species, requiring all federal agencies to ensure their actions do not harm the lives of the endangered. This is important to pest control because the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) can restrict the use of pesticides that may be threatening.  Northwest Exterminating provides itself on not only meeting these standards, but also exceeding them by providing green pest control as an alternative to traditional pest control.

According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, “Pesticides are useful to society because they are used to control…potential disease-causing organisms, insects, weeds and other pests.”  The EPA takes careful measures to ensure that the products used to control pests do not have unreasonable effects on humans or the environment.  For instance, this agency regulates the sale and use of ALL pesticides used in the United States. Just as recently as 2008, the EPA began the Pesticide Registration Review Programs to update research on how pesticides may affect endangered species.

 

Sources:

http://www.fws.gov/contaminants/Issues/Pesticides.cfm

Georgia Pest Control Employee Registration Manual

 

Termite Fighting Tips from UGA

UGA recently released an article that gave helpful tips on how you can help your home to be less of a target to termites.  We all know that termites cause millions of dollars worth of damage each year.  Once you have a termite infestation, not only do you have to repair the damage but you must call on the help of a professional to get rid of them.   These simple steps are a great way to stay proactive so that termites don’t become an issue.

Tips such as keeping wood products away from the perimeter of your home, keeping water away from the foundation, sealing cracks and crevices in the structure, and working with your termite professional to prevent termites feeding on your home.

To read the full article with helpful tips from UGA entomologist, Brian Forschler, CLICK HERE.

For termite protection on your property, call Northwest!