Increasing Wildlife, Increasing Spending?

Wildlife ControlAccording to a recent article by the Wall Street Journal, wildlife damage to crops, landscaping and infrastructure now exceeds $28 billion a year.  The article addresses the benefits to the increase in wildlife but also the damage they can cause and the effect it has on our local economies.

This year, Princeton, N.J., has hired sharpshooters to cull 250 deer from the town’s herd of 550 over the winter. The cost: $58,700. Columbia, S.C., is spending $1 million to rid its drainage systems of beavers and their dams. The 2009 “miracle on the Hudson,” when US Airways flight 1549 had to make an emergency landing after its engines ingested Canada geese, saved 155 passengers and crew, but the $60 million A320 Airbus was a complete loss. In the U.S., the total cost of wildlife damage to crops, landscaping and infrastructure now exceeds $28 billion a year ($1.5 billion from deer-vehicle crashes alone), according to Michael Conover of Utah State University, who monitors conflicts between people and wildlife.

Click here to read the whole article.

For wildlife removal or exclusion needs in your home or business, call Northwest.  A Wildlife Control representative will inspect your property for evidence of wildlife and will determine the points of entry being used by these critters to get into your structure. A customized plan will be developed to get the immediate nuisance under control and to seal off any known points of entry.

Source: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970204846304578090753716856728.html#

Northwest Exterminating
830 Kennesaw Ave MariettaGA30060 USA 
 • 888-466-7849
 

The History of Pest Control

Since the advent of agriculture, humans have needed a means to prevent pests from destroying their crops. Techniques such as crop rotation, intercropping and selective breeding of pest-resistant plants sought to make plants less desirable to weeds as well as herbivores. Nowadays, if your garden seems a delectable treat, Northwest offers modern methods through Lawn Care and Wildlife services to tackle these problems.

The traditional idea most people have of pest control involves the use of pesticides. Chemical pesticides, substances intended for the prevention of pests, aim to protect plants by producing an effect that deters, incapacitates, or kills pests. Historians credit Sumerians as the first known civilization to employ pesticides by using sulfur compounds to rid their crops in 2500 B.C. The Egyptians, as well as Chinese, used natural products such as herbs and oils to prevent infestation.  With NorPest Green and other Green services, Northwest takes after these ancient societies by using natural methods that eliminate pests with minimal harm to the ecological balance of the environment. We don’t just do pest management – we create healthier living and working environments.

The modern history of pest control began in the 18th and 19th century with the advent of widespread industrialization and mechanization. With the introduction of chemical compounds pyrethrum and derris, pest control became more widespread. The early 20th century saw another change in the pest control industry, with the use of DDT and herbicides. After the 1962 publishing of Rachel Carson’s book “Silent Spring,” the use of known harmful chemicals such as DDT came to a halt. Since then, the shift in pest management has been towards more traditional and natural pest management.

As stated earlier, Northwest maintains a commitment to creating healthier living and work environments by providing green pest control. We know the importance of protecting the health of our clients, their residences and workplaces by offering products that prevent pests without incurring ecological damage. As the Southeast’s leader in Green pest control, Northwest has proven that our products can control pests the way nature intended. We know that this is the future in pest management and hope you become a part of it too by joining the Northwest family.

Melissa Brown
mbrown@callnorthwest.com

Sources:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pest_control

http://extension.psu.edu/ipm/schools/educators/curriculum/contents/shorthistory