The Importance of Mosquito Treatments

The Importance of Mosquito Treatments

Mosquitoes are known to be a nuisance. With the warmer weather upon us, taking the necessary steps to avoid these pests is extremely important. Mosquito control treatments performed by professionals can help reduce these pests by targeting adult mosquitoes and larvae throughout your property. There are several factors that determine how these treatments can help protect you, your family, and your property.

Mosquito season typically runs from April to October, with warm seasons being a major factor in their activity. Mosquitoes are highly attracted to standing water. They will usually lay their eggs in water for survival, only needing a small amount of water to do so. Once these eggs hatch, it can be difficult to try and control them.

If mosquitoes have hatched and are roaming your property, they can find their way inside your home. Mosquitoes are small, measuring only 1/8 – 3/8” long. They can easily fit inside small holes or gaps leading into your house. Ensuring that your windows and doors have screens in good repair is essential for keeping them out. If inside, mosquitoes will search for a perfect place to lay eggs, including in areas with house plants and water trays. These nuisance pests will lay their eggs in water trays and even feed off the plants for energy.

Female mosquitoes will bite and feed on humans and animals, as they require a blood meal to lay fertile eggs. These bites can become red, itchy, and irritating for both humans and animals. Mosquito bites are equally dangerous; mosquitoes can spread viruses such as West Nile or dengue fever through their bites. To avoid mosquito bites, take precautions when you know you’ll be outside during the peak season. Use EPA-registered mosquito repellants, wear long-sleeved shirts and pants, and avoid using scented lotions or bath products.

With mosquito treatments, a pest professional can inspect your property and identify the resting and breeding areas to more effectively eliminate these pests. These services are recommended monthly during peak mosquito season so you can have a bite-free spring and summer! If you are concerned with mosquitoes on your property, contact your local pest control company for a free inspection!

Spring is Here & So Are Mosquitoes! Here's How You Can Prevent Mosquito Bites & Diseases Like Zika

Spring is Here & So Are Mosquitoes! Here's How You Can Prevent Mosquito Bites & Diseases Like Zika

It’s the first official week of Spring (aka Mosquito Season)! Time to start thinking about mosquito prevention.
The risk of contracting mosquito-borne Zika virus in the U.S. is at an all-time high, specifically dangerous for pregnant women or those trying to conceive as the virus can cause serious birth defects. According to the CDC, 222 cases of Zika were reported as of March 15, 2017, acquired through local mosquito-borne transmission in Florida and Texas. And because there’s currently no vaccine for Zika, the only way to prevent it is with mosquito bite prevention. Here’s how you can minimize your risk and limit the spread of Zika.

Home Mosquito Control

The best way to prevent mosquito bites when spending time outside this spring and summer is to reduce mosquito populations around your home with a mosquito control program. Usually consisting of monthly treatments, a professional mosquito control program includes:

  • Removal and/or reduction of mosquito resting and breeding sites – any areas that accumulate standing water like planters, toys, bird baths, pet bowls, containers, etc.
  • Larvicide treatments to mosquito breeding sites that cannot be removed, targeting mosquito larvae which inhibits maturity into adult mosquitoes
  • Adulticide treatments to mosquito resting sites – shaded areas, shrubbery, small trees, ivy, etc. – reducing the amount of adult mosquitoes around your home
  • Monthly inspections and recommendations on how to reduce mosquito breeding and resting areas

Other ways you can prevent mosquito bites:

  • Cover arms and legs when spending time outdoors with light, loose-fitting clothing
  • Keep mosquitoes out of your home by identifying entry points like broken, damaged, or missing window and door screens and make necessary repairs
  • Reduce mosquito breeding areas by eliminating any items inside that can accumulate standing water
  • Use EPA-registered insect repellents that contain DEET, picaridin, IR3535, oil of lemon eucalyptus or para-menthane-diol, or 2-undecanone

 

Spring is Here & So Are Mosquitoes! Here's How You Can Prevent Mosquito Bites & Diseases Like Zika

Spring is Here & So Are Mosquitoes! Here’s How You Can Prevent Mosquito Bites & Diseases Like Zika

It’s the first official week of Spring (aka Mosquito Season)! Time to start thinking about mosquito prevention.

The risk of contracting mosquito-borne Zika virus in the U.S. is at an all-time high, specifically dangerous for pregnant women or those trying to conceive as the virus can cause serious birth defects. According to the CDC, 222 cases of Zika were reported as of March 15, 2017, acquired through local mosquito-borne transmission in Florida and Texas. And because there’s currently no vaccine for Zika, the only way to prevent it is with mosquito bite prevention. Here’s how you can minimize your risk and limit the spread of Zika.

Home Mosquito Control

The best way to prevent mosquito bites when spending time outside this spring and summer is to reduce mosquito populations around your home with a mosquito control program. Usually consisting of monthly treatments, a professional mosquito control program includes:

  • Removal and/or reduction of mosquito resting and breeding sites – any areas that accumulate standing water like planters, toys, bird baths, pet bowls, containers, etc.
  • Larvicide treatments to mosquito breeding sites that cannot be removed, targeting mosquito larvae which inhibits maturity into adult mosquitoes
  • Adulticide treatments to mosquito resting sites – shaded areas, shrubbery, small trees, ivy, etc. – reducing the amount of adult mosquitoes around your home
  • Monthly inspections and recommendations on how to reduce mosquito breeding and resting areas

Other ways you can prevent mosquito bites:

  • Cover arms and legs when spending time outdoors with light, loose-fitting clothing
  • Keep mosquitoes out of your home by identifying entry points like broken, damaged, or missing window and door screens and make necessary repairs
  • Reduce mosquito breeding areas by eliminating any items inside that can accumulate standing water
  • Use EPA-registered insect repellents that contain DEET, picaridin, IR3535, oil of lemon eucalyptus or para-menthane-diol, or 2-undecanone

 

CDC Confirms Local Transmission of Zika Virus Near Miami Florida

CDC Confirms Local Transmission of Zika Virus Near Miami Florida

The first cases of locally transmitted Zika virus were reported this week in Florida. On July 29th, 4 people infected with Zika virus in Miami reportedly were bitten by mosquitoes within the city. On August 1st, that number grew from 4 to 14 infected. Until now, all reported cases of Zika in the United States have been linked to those who recently travelled to countries with known Zika transmissions.

Due to the recent developments, the Centers for Disease Control are warning pregnant women and their partners to avoid traveling to Miami and surrounding areas. Zika virus is extremely dangerous to unborn babies, potentially causing a condition known as Microcephaly, a birth defect characterized by abnormally small heads and underdeveloped brain function. Pregnant women and/or their partners that have recently travelled to the area (on or after June 15th) should be tested immediately for Zika virus and those living in and around Miami should exercise strict mosquito bite prevention and avoid unprotected sex.

As for the rest of the country, the risk of contracting Zika from mosquitoes isn’t an immediate threat since mosquitoes carrying Zika do not travel far (a mile or less in their lifetime). BUT, because symptoms of Zika often go unnoticed, those that have recently traveled to the area and may have Zika are likely to pass the virus on to sexual partners, OR could spread the virus to another mosquito if bitten. In turn, that mosquito could then transmit Zika to other people.

Because of its unpredictability, practicing mosquito bite prevention in any warm, humid climate (within the US and when traveling abroad) is key – especially for pregnant women and those planning to become pregnant. Use an insect repellent with DEET when outdoors, keep arms and legs covered with light-colored, loose clothing, stay away from areas with stagnant, standing water, and consider a home mosquito control program by an exterminating company.

Mosquito-Borne Zika Virus Now Linked to Permanent Blindness

Mosquito-Borne Zika Virus Now Linked to Permanent Blindness

By now we know that Zika Virus, a mosquito-borne disease, carries some serious health threats and risks, previously thought to be most dangerous for pregnant mothers and their unborn babies. If bitten by the Aedes aegypti mosquito carrying Zika, an unborn baby could potentially be born with a serious birth defect called Microcephaly, causing abnormally small heads and impaired brain function.

Zika Virus Causes Blindness

Now Zika Virus is also being linked to and eye infection causing permanent blindness, reported by the New England Journal of Medicine last week. This Zika-induced eye infection, uveitis, can cause glaucoma, cataracts and loss of vision.

How can you protect yourself?

If you’ve recently traveled to countries with documented Zika transmission – like Brazil, parts of the Carribbean and Central America, Mexico, and the Pacific Islands – see an ophthalmologist. Potential signs and symptoms of an eye infection related to Zika Virus are eye redness, pain or sensitivity to light. If left untreated, uveitis can “cause irrevocable damage to the retina,” according to Dr. C. Stephen Foster, president of the Massachusetts Eye Research and Surgery Institution in Waltham.

Planning to travel to a country with recent Zika outbreaks?

Protect yourself from mosquito bites by using bug repellent with DEET and keeping your arms and legs covered with loose-fitting long sleeves and pants (find out more about mosquito bite prevention here). Pregnant women or women expecting to become pregnant should avoid traveling to these countries all together. The same applies to men that are trying to conceive with their partner; Zika Virus can be sexually transmitted from men to women.

2016 Summer Olympics

Those planning to travel to Rio, Brazil for the upcoming 2016 Summer Olympics are especially at risk. At least 4-6 weeks prior to your trip, talk to your doctor about vaccinations and medicines recommended for travel to Brazil. It’s also a good idea to purchase travel health and medical evacuation insurance, according to the CDC, and stay up to date with travel warnings and breaking news in that area. While visiting Rio, mosquito bite prevention is key to reducing your risk of Zika and other mosquito-born diseases. Wear mosquito repellent with DEET around the clock, avoid areas of standing or stagnant water, and wear loose, light-colored clothing that covers arms and legs. And since Zika can be sexually-transmitted, avoid unprotected sex during travel and for at least 8 weeks after. The CDC recommends that pregnant women not go to the Olympics.

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