Although many people don’t welcome the sight of a snake in their yard, they are actually quite beneficial to have around. Snakes eat mice, grubs, slugs, and other insects around your home and are also a source of food for birds of prey like hawks. While most species of snakes are non-venomous, there are a few types of snakes that are venomous in our area. For this reason, you should never handle a snake unless you are 100% sure you know what species it is. Most snakes will bite when harassed whether they are venomous or not.

There are many natural snake repellent methods out there today with one of the most common being mothballs. But are they really effective? According to experts at the Blue Ridge Poison Center the answer is a resounding NO. Mothballs are made of either naphthalene or paradicholorbenzene. Both of these chemicals are hazardous to both humans and animals if exposed to or ingested. The chemical makeup of each of these substances allow them to turn into gas when they are exposed to the air – resulting in the strong smell we usually associate with mothballs. These fumes can cause dizziness and irritation to the eyes and the lungs. If ingested, mothballs can cause a condition called hemolytic anemia which is very dangerous. Mothballs also resemble candy to young children, making them more likely to pick them up and handle or eat them.

So if mothballs aren’t the answer, how can you get rid of snakes? Here are a few snake prevention tips you can use safely around your home.

  • Make your home and yard less attractive to snakes who are looking for food and shelter.
  • Remove any food sources such as rodents or other pests.
  • Keep pet food sealed in containers.
  • Don’t leave pet food out overnight.
  • Clean up spilled pet food and birdseed from the ground.
  • Don’t overwater your lawn as this can attract worms, frogs, and slugs – another food source for snakes.
  • Have your home inspected for rodents and other pests and maintain routine pest control treatments.
  • Seal any entries into your crawlspace or basement that are larger than 1/4″.
  • Make sure doorsweeps and window screens fit tightly.
  • Cover vents and drains that come into the house.
  • Keep grass mowed – tall grass and weeds provide more coverage for snakes from predators.
  • Clean up any debris snakes can hide under (scarp metal, wood piles, trash, logs, etc.).
  • Check the roof for overhanging vegetation – snakes are good climbers and can access your home from the roof.

If you have a problem with snakes or other wildlife, contact your local pest control company who can help identify pest attractants, points of entry, and provide you with safe and humane snake removal services.

 

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