Insects in Art

When you reflect on famous artists and their work, like the Mona Lisa by DaVinci for instance, you can immediately appreciate the beauty of their masterpiece. However, when the subject of an artwork is an insect, you might have a little more trouble seeing the beauty in it before wanting to call an exterminator! The brave souls who did make insects their muse had an appreciation for natural history, especially during the 17th century.

Studying bugs for their connection to the earth and nature led to some beautiful creations by Albrecht Dürer such as the Stag Beetle. Dürer said of art, “It is indeed true that art is omnipresent in nature, and the true artist is he who can bring it out.”

Albrecht Durer, Stag Beetle, 1505

Albrecht Durer, Stag Beetle, 1505

Some artists liked to focus on butterflies because they represented transformation and resurrection. Wenceslaus Hollar’s drawing Forty-One Insects, Moths and Butterflies features a collection of bugs of different varieties on displaying much like a “cabinet of curiosity.” Check out this painting and more below!

Wenceslaus Hollar, Forty-One Insects, Moths and Butterflies, 1646

Wenceslaus Hollar, Forty-One Insects, Moths and Butterflies, 1646

Robert Hooke, Ant, from Micrographia London, 1665

Robert Hooke, Ant, from Micrographia
London, 1665

Maria Sibyla Merian, Branch of guava tree with leafcutter ants, army ants, pink-toed tarantulas, c. 1701-5

Maria Sibyla Merian, Branch of guava tree with leafcutter ants, army ants, pink-toed tarantulas, c. 1701-5

Melissa Brown
mbrown@callnorthwest.com

Source:

http://venetianred.net/2010/04/20/the-busy-bee-has-no-time-for-sorrow-insects-in-art/

Northwest Exterminating
830 Kennesaw Ave MariettaGA30060 USA 
 • 888-466-7849
 

Organic Pest Control – Companion Planting

Ever wonder how gardens stayed plush and green without modern pest control techniques? Before exterminating companies existed, many planters relied on a method of organic pest control known as companion planting. Companion planting involves placing plants in your garden that have qualities that deter pests that surround and protect your other plants. For instance, planting certain herbs in your vegetable garden can attract beneficial insects while simultaneously repelling harmful ones.

One pest that likes to frequent gardens is the aphid, otherwise known as plant lice. These tiny insects suck the sap from the plant, taking all the nutrients to keep the plant healthy and living. Sometimes as they are feeding, aphids transmit plant viruses to plants such as potatoes and citrus plants, which can kill the plants. Planting chives, coriander or nasturtium around your plants will discourage infestations by these plants.

Nasturtium

Nasturtium

Certain plants can keep larger pests out of your garden. For instance, planting lavender not only deter ticks, but also moths and mice. Mice also do not like the smell of daffodils, which can be used as a colorful boarder for an herb garden. Additionally, rabbits do not like the smell of onions, which can be planted alongside peas, beans, lettuce and cabbage. Lastly, sprinkling cayenne pepper on your plants can act as a deterrent for raccoons.

If companion planting still does not do the job of minimizing pest invasions, Northwest Exterminating offers pest control services that not only takes care of pest, but also does it in a green, environmentally friendly way! Northwest offers many services that will protect your plants, home and office environment. We offer more than pest elimination, but also healthier living and working environments. Check out our website for more info at www.callnorthwest.com

Melissa Brown
mbrown@callnorthwest.com

Sources:

http://gardening.about.com/od/naturalorganiccontrol/a/Companion_2.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aphid

http://www.naturalnews.com/035853_companion_planting_garden_vegetables.html

 

Inspecting Your Pantry for Pests

red flour beetles

Red flour beetles in a bag of flour

Baking is a big part of tradition for lots of people during the holiday season.  And what better time while you’re breaking out all of the baking supplies to inspect your pantry for signs of pests.  Pests are living creatures that are in search of the same things we are…food, water, and shelter.  A pantry where those necessities are stored is an ideal place for pests to make a home.

Common pests that are found in pantries:

Below are tips on ways to inspect your pantry for pests:

  • Place foods in tightly sealed containers.  This will keep bugs out and freshness in.
  • Unpack seasonal decorations outside.  Dried foliage, potpourri, etc, should be unpacked outside of the home and inspected before displaying in your home.
  • Place a bay leaf in containers of dry foods like flour and rice.  The smell of bay leaves often repels pests.
  • Inspect groceries before bringing them in to your home.  As with anything you bring into your home, be sure to inspect it.
  • Always check the date before using items in your pantry.  Frequent checks of this throughout the year can be beneficial.
  • Clean messes immediately.  Wipe any spills or crumbs as soon as they happen and take the trash out regularly.
  • Place trash in a tightly sealed bag.  Remove the bag frequently to a garbage can outside of the home that is equipped with a tightly sealed lid.
  • Seal cracks or holes that pests could use to enter your home.
  • Eliminate moisture areas.  Seal leaky pipes and use humidifiers in the home.  Water is a major attractant for bugs so the less access they have to water, the better.

If you find pests in your pantry, throw out the infested food immediately.  If pests have made a home in your pantry you should call your professional pest control company.  A professional exterminator will be able to inspect the area and treat the problem properly and efficiently.

Sources:

http://www.pestworld.org/news-and-views/pest-articles/articles/preventing-pantry-pests/

http://lancaster.unl.edu/pest/resources/pantrypests304.shtml

 

5 Bugs to Love

Valentine’s Day is a day of LOVE!  Bugs aren’t something that we usually “love” but in the spirit of the holiday, here are 5 bugs to love!

  1. Ladybugs are not only one of the cuter bugs out there but they are beneficial because they eat large quantities of aphids, mites and other arthropods that feed on various plants in your yard or garden. Imported more than 100 years ago to defend orchards and orange groves, ladybugs can eat up to 5,000 pests in their lifetime.
  2. Earthworms are nature’s most efficient composters.  These scavengers create the kind of well-aerated, humus-rich soil gardeners call “black gold.”
  3. The love bug is also known as the honeymoon fly, kissing bug, or double-headed bug.  The adult is a small, flying insect common to the southeastern United States, especially along the Gulf Coast.  During and after mating, adult pairs remain coupled, even in flight, for up to several days.
  4. The praying mantis is named for the “praying” position that it often assumes.  This insect will eat just about any living thing it can fit in its mouth, helpful or not. It is known to consume mosquitoes, nocturnal moths, bees, beetles, small lizards, even frogs—as well as fellow praying mantises.
  5. Bumblebees collect nectar and the pollen that will make tomato plants and apple trees produce more fruit.  The female bumblebee can sting but they much prefer to stick to gentler business.