Do I Have Moles in My Yard?

Do I Have Moles in My Yard?

A perfectly manicured yard can be destroyed by moles in an instant! These creatures dig tunnels in search of lawn pests in your yard, including grubs, earthworms, and other bugs. Once moles invade, it can be difficult to control and remove them from your property as they can go undetected for long periods of time. One of the best ways to understand mole prevention is understanding the signs of their activity in the first place. We break down common mole signs and the preventative measures to place at your home to avoid their destruction.

Common Mole Signs

There’s no one sign that can pinpoint moles in your yard but there’s several to lookout for if you suspect you’ve got a mole infestation, including:

  • Molehills
  • Yellow or damaged grass
  • Tunnels and runaways
  • Overturned soil
  • Small craters
  • A spongy ground when you walk on it

If you’ve noticed any or all of these signs on your property, it’s likely that you have a mole in your yard.

Preventing Moles

There are several methods you can utilize to avoid mole activity. Consider the following mole control tips and tricks:

  • Moles feed on grubs and insects so it’s important to eliminate these lawn pests to not only help reduce mole activity but also keep a healthy lawn.
  • Use nontoxic mole repellent in your yard by mixing three parts castor oil, one part dish soap, and water. Castor oil will upset mole’s digestion and encourage them to find a food source somewhere else.
  • Owls are one of the biggest mole predators. Consider installing an owl nesting box on your property in the late winter or early spring when owls begin looking to nest. Owls will help control both the mole and small rodent population on your property.
  • To keep moles out of a specific area, such as a garden bed, create a trench around the perimeter. Dig this trench about three feet deep and fill it with rocks or wire mesh to extend to the bottom of it.

Since moles live underground, it can be difficult to prevent and control them. The best treatment for moles is target elimination through baiting, which is best done by a professional wildlife control company. These expert professionals will be able to track the mole, strategically place traps, utilize effective baits, treat the mole tunnels to avoid another mole infestation, and monitor the tunnels to ensure all moles have been removed. If you suspect moles in your yard, call your local wildlife control company for a free evaluation.

Common Georgia Bats and What to Do If They Invade

Common Georgia Bats and What to Do If They Invade

Bats are often misunderstood and feared by many, but they play an essential role in maintaining the balance of Georgia’s ecosystem. Georgia is home to 16 different types of bats, each contributing to the environment in unique and beneficial ways. Let’s go over some common Georgia bats and why they are so beneficial to humans.

Common Bats in Georgia

  • Eastern Red Bat: These small, tree roosting bats are often seen in heavily wooded areas. They have rusty-red fur which makes them more recognizable when seen.
  • Big Brown Bat: These bats are on the larger size and are known for their robust appearance. They often roost in buildings and feed on insects.
  • Little Brown Bat: These bats are common in Georgia and play a vital role in controlling insect populations.

Benefits of Bats in Georgia

  • Some species can consume their body weight in insects each night. This helps keep populations of pests low, including mosquitoes.
  • Bats are also very beneficial in pollinating certain flowers, including some fruit-bearing species.
  • They also help aid in forest regeneration by dispersing seeds. The fruits they feed on contain seeds and then they transport the seeds to various locations.

Conservation Efforts of Bats

While bats offer numerous benefits, they face several threats. This includes habitat loss, disease, and disturbance in roosting sites. Georgia has conservation initiatives aimed at protecting these creatures by protecting their roosting sites, educating the public, and monitoring bat populations for diseases, like white-nose syndrome.

Removing bats is a delicate matter in the state of Georgia and should only be handled by licensed wildlife control professionals. If you suspect you have bats in your home, be sure to give your local wildlife control company a call today!

Summer Wildlife: Raccoons

Summer Wildlife: Raccoons

Raccoons are common wildlife found around homes or anywhere they can find an available food source. Although they look cute and cuddly, they are very aggressive when cornered and can cause significant damage to your home and yard.

Raccoons mate in February and March and litters are born 60-70 days after. They have anywhere from 2 to 5 kits per litter. Young raccoons are fully weaned and independent from their mothers in the summer, which is why we often see more of them this time of year. Mother raccoons are finding food and new nesting sites for their newly independent babies.

Raccoons will nest high in trees and are often found in our attics and crawlspaces. They are omnivores and will feed on anything, often raiding our trashcans for a meal. In late summer, they increase their food intake to build up their fat layers for the upcoming winter months.

Raccoons cause damage by upending trashcans and spreading trash across our yards, leaving droppings behind that contaminate our homes, urinating in attics which contaminates insulation and can cause mold, chewing through wires causing fire hazards, and shredding insulation for nests which can lead to costly damages and increased heating and air bills.

You can prevent raccoons by:

  • Getting rid of food sources. These pests won’t hang around if there’s nothing to eat. Secure trashcan lids with either locking lids, bungee cords, or heavy items like cinder blocks placed on top. Bring pet food and bird feeders inside overnight. Clean up fruit that may have fallen from trees on the ground.
  • Sealing entrances. Raccoons prefer to nest in dark, cozy spaces. They will often nest in attics, crawlspaces, and under porches. Block off entrances to these areas by closing gaps in attics, roofs, and siding and installing trellises around the bottom of porches.
  • Calling professional wildlife control. They can be very aggressive when cornered or trapped. Contact your local pest control company who can safely remove and relocate raccoons from your property.
Common Summer Wildlife in Georgia

Common Summer Wildlife in Georgia

Summer is a time when wildlife is often more active and visible around your home. While it can be exciting to see these animals, it’s important to take precautions to keep them out of your home and prevent any potential damage. Here is the most common summer wildlife you’ll begin seeing soon and some tips on how you can keep these critters away!

Squirrels

Squirrels are a common sight in many neighborhoods during the summer. While they can be fun to watch, they can also cause damage to your home and property.

To prevent squirrels in your attic or crawlspace:

  • Make sure to seal any gaps in your home’s exterior
  • Fix any holes in your roof or siding
  • Trim back any tree branches that may be close to your home

Raccoons

Raccoons are another common summer wildlife that you may find around your home. They can be attracted to garbage cans and compost bins.

To prevent raccoons from being attracted to your property:

  • Make sure to also seal any gaps or holes in your roof or siding
  • Use trash cans with sealed lids

Snakes

Snakes are more active during the summer months and may be found around your home or yard. It’s not often that you’ll see venomous snakes near your property, but there are some that live in Georgia. Just be on the lookout while outside hiking or walking through wooded areas.

To prevent snakes from entering your home:

  • Make sure to seal any gaps or holes in your foundation or walls
  • Keep your yard tidy and free of debris

We hope these tips will help lessen the chances of wildlife finding their way indoors this summer. If you begin to suspect your home might have some uninvited guests, give your local wildlife control company a call today!

Common Rats and Mice You Might See this Spring

Common Rats and Mice You Might See this Spring

Rodents, such as rats and mice, are common household pests that can cause many problems, from property damage to health issues. In the southern United States, there are several types of rats and mice that are commonly found near homes. Let’s go over the most common types of rats and mice and how to prevent them from invading your home.

Roof Rat

Roof rats are also known as black rats and are commonly found in urban and suburban areas. They are about 7-10 inches in length and have pointed snouts, large ears, and long, thin tails. They are excellent climbers and can often be found in attics and trees.

Norway Rat

Norway rats are also known as brown rats and are larger than roof rats, measuring 10-12 inches in length. They have blunt snouts, small ears, and short, thick tails. They are burrowers and are often found in basements and crawl spaces.

House Mouse

House mice are small rodents that are about 3-4 inches in length. They have pointed snouts, large ears, and long, thin tails. They are excellent climbers and can often be found in attics and walls.

Deer Mouse

Deer mice are small rodents that are about 3-4 inches in length. They are brown or gray in color and have large eyes and ears. They are often found in rural areas and can carry hantavirus, a potentially fatal disease.

How to prevent rodents:

  • Seal any cracks or openings in your home’s exterior
  • Keep your home clean and free of clutter
  • Store food in sealed containers
  • Keep basement and crawl space clean and free of debris
  • Keep trees trimmed away from your home

If you believe you have a rodent infestation, give your local wildlife control company a call to provide a customized plan of action!

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