Prep Your Yard & Keep Mosquito Free!

Prep Your Yard & Keep Mosquito Free!

Spending time outdoors is a great way to escape the hustle and bustle of everyday life. Whether it’s spending time by the pool, having a picnic, or just lounging in the yard, relaxing outside is a great activity for the whole family. But the last thing you want to have to deal with while spending time in your yard are mosquitoes.  Mosquitoes can be a danger to your family and even pets as they survive by sucking blood from animals and humans. They are usually found in areas of high humidity looking for stagnant, standing water to breed. Luckily, there are ways you can prep your yard to prevent mosquitoes.

Remove Unnecessary Items

Since mosquitoes breed in standing water, it is essential to eliminate any items that could hold water. Items such as foundations, toy buckets, outdoor pet bowls, flowerpot sauces, tarps, pool covers, and more should not stay in your yard for a long period of time. It’s also important to remove excess grass, leaves, firewood, and yard clippings as mosquitoes tend to stay in grass and debris around your home.

Clean Your Gutters

Clogged gutters can not only create standing water but will also catch debris and leaves. This provides mosquitoes a perfect breeding location. Make sure that your gutters are clean and clear, especially after a thunderstorm. Consider installing gutter guards to help prevent clogs and clutter.

Fill Hollow Areas

Any low-lying areas like ditches can also collect standing water after rain or watering plants. Make sure to check around your yard that you don’t have these; if you do notice them you can simply fill them in with dirt. Additionally, check for any hollow logs and stumps throughout your yard. They not only can hold standing water but will also provide overwintering mosquitoes a place to hibernate during cold weather.

Maintain the Pool

If you have a well-maintained pool, mosquitoes will most likely avoid it. However, if a pool goes unused for a long period of time, these pests will be attracted to the stagnant water. Make sure to keep the pool maintained or covered if you’re planning to not use it for a while.

By utilizing these tips, you can start to enjoy your yard and worry less about mosquito bites! If you are still having an infestation of mosquitoes, it’s best to contact your local pest company to provide you with the best plan of action to eliminate mosquitoes. Request a Free Estimate now to get started.

How to Prep Your Yard for a Mosquito Bite-Free Summer

How to Prep Your Yard for a Mosquito Bite-Free Summer

The sun is shining, the warm breeze is blowing, you’ve got your feet up, unwinding from the week, when…OUCH! That moment of relaxation you’ve been waiting for was suddenly interrupted by a painful mosquito bite. At this point you’re annoyed, thinking about going back inside to avoid more bites, or wondering if you should make an appointment with your doctor to check for Zika or West Nile. What a summer bummer!

Mosquitoes not only pose serious risks for your family, but pets are a target too. Heartworms are parasites transmitted to dogs and cats through mosquito bites, that live in pets’ bloodstream, lungs and heart, and can cause serious, even deadly, side effects.

Don’t let mosquitoes suck the life out of your summer. Protect family and pets and take back your yard with these easy mosquito bite prevention tips:

Attack Mosquitoes at the Source

Mosquitoes breed in areas with stagnant, standing water like fountains and water features, toys, buckets, outdoor pet bowls, bird baths, clogged gutters, vases, flowerpot saucers, old tires or tire swings, rain barrels, trash cans and trash can lids, tarps, kiddie pools, and pool covers. The best way to prevent mosquito bites is to remove these items/areas and to treat your yard with mosquito control products. This is included in a monthly mosquito reduction program and is guaranteed to drastically reduce the number of mosquitoes in and around your yard.

Use Insect Repellent

One of the best ways to prevent Zika and other mosquito-borne diseases is to use skin-applied insect repellent when you’re going to be outside. Formulas that contain DEET and picaridin were found to be most effective at preventing mosquito bites (and those with natural plant oils least effective), according to Consumer Reports.

Cover Up

If you really want to further prevent bites, keep arms and legs covered when outdoors with light-colored, loose clothing. Sometimes this can be just as uncomfortable as getting bitten, though, with the scorching summer heat. If you leave skin exposed, be sure to reapply insect repellent often (especially if you’ll be swimming).

Use Fans

Consider using fans in areas you’ll be hanging out this summer – on decks, patios, around pools, etc. Mosquitoes are weak fliers so the winds from fans will make it hard for them to get close enough to bite.

 

Mosquito Diseases: Are You at Risk?

Mosquito Diseases: Are You at Risk?

Mosquitoes are known carriers of several viruses, transmitting disease and parasites to people and animals that come in contact with them via painful bites. While some of these diseases don’t pose serious health risks, others can be deadly (over one million people die each year from mosquito-borne diseases, according to the AMCA!). Here are 3 common mosquito diseases you should be cautious of this summer:

Zika Virus

What is it?

First discovered in 1947, Zika, a mosquito-borne virus, originated in Uganda, Africa. Shortly after, outbreaks of Zika were detected throughout tropical areas in Africa, Southeast Asia, and the Pacific Islands, according to the CDC. Now, mosquitoes carrying Zika have been identified in many countries, including the U.S.

How do you get it?

Primarily transmitted by the Aedes species, infected mosquitoes can spread Zika to humans and animals through bites. These mosquitoes are active during daytime and evening hours. Zika can also be sexually transmitted from one infected partner to another, from pregnant women to unborn babies, and through blood transfusions.

What are the symptoms?

Common symptom of Zika include rash, fever, joint and muscle pain, headache, and/or red eyes and can last for up to a week, but many infected won’t show any symptoms at all. Zika is dangerous specifically for pregnant women as it can cause birth defects, a condition called Microcephaly, in fetuses. This can cause brain and eye defects, hearing deficits, and impair growth.

How do you prevent it?

Because there’s currently no vaccine to treat and/or cure Zika, the best way to protect yourself is by preventing mosquito bites. Keep arms and legs covered in loose, light-colored clothing when outdoors and use insect repellent. Repair or replace missing or damaged window and door screens at home and keep them closed as often as possible. Control mosquito populations around your home by getting rid of adult mosquitoes as well as reducing mosquito reproduction with home mosquito treatments from a licensed pest control company. Most companies offer eco-friendly mosquito treatment options that are family and pet-friendly, if having your yard treated with chemicals is a concern. If pregnant, the CDC advises to avoid traveling to countries with known Zika outbreaks  – see the list here – and refrain from unprotected sex.

What if you have it?

Check with your doctor to get tested. To minimize symptoms, drink lots of fluids, get plenty of rest, reduce fever or pain with over-the-counter pain medicines (avoid aspirin), and prevent additional mosquito bites. If you’re bitten by a mosquito once infected, you can pass Zika to other mosquitoes, who will then infect someone else – increasing the spread of Zika. If you’re pregnant and suspect you have Zika, contact your physician immediately.

West Nile Virus

What is it?

The first occurrences of West Nile in the U.S emerged in New York in 1999 with 62 confirmed cases and 7 human deaths, according to the AMCA. West Nile virus is a mosquito-borne virus carried by many different mosquitoes, one of the most common being the Culex species.

How do you get it?

West Nile is most often transferred from birds to mosquitoes, and then from mosquitoes to humans and animals through bites.

What are the symptoms?

Symptoms may develop 3-14 days after bitten. Typically only 20% of people infected with West Nile virus will experience symptoms which include headache, body aches, and fever and usually last a week or less. Rarely, the virus develops into West Nile encephalitis which can cause high fever, neck stiffness, disorientation, coma, muscle weakness, convulsions, paralysis, and sometimes death. This is most common in people over the age of 50.

How do you prevent it?

Like Zika, there is no vaccine for West Nile virus. Prevent the virus by preventing mosquito bites.

What if you have it?

See your doctor. A blood test can determine if you’re infected with West Nile virus. If symptoms are severe, hospitalization may be necessary.

Dengue

What is it?

Dengue, a mosquito-borne virus, is the leading cause of illness and death in the tropics and subtropics according to the CDC (400 million people infected each year). While it rarely occurs in the U.S., it’s important to be aware of dengue while traveling to popular tourist destinations like Puerto Rico, parts of Central and South America, Southeast Asia, and the Pacific islands. Dengue is carried by the Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquito species which are found throughout the world.

How do you get it?

Mosquitoes carrying dengue infect humans through bites and infected humans can infect other mosquitoes, when bitten.

What are the symptoms?

Most cases of dengue in the U.S. were acquired through travel abroad. Symptoms include severe headache, high fever, eye pain, joint pain, muscle pain, and rash. Severe cases can cause stomach pain, vomiting, difficulty breathing, and bleeding from gums and/or nose.

How do you prevent it?

Mosquito bite prevention is key when traveling to areas with known dengue outbreaks as there is no vaccine for dengue or medications to treat it. It’s especially critical for people with dengue to avoid mosquito bites so the disease isn’t spread from person to another mosquito.

What if you have it?

If symptoms are mild, lots of rest and fluids are recommended. For more severe symptoms, contact your health care provider immediately.

Spring is Here & So Are Mosquitoes! Here's How You Can Prevent Mosquito Bites & Diseases Like Zika

Spring is Here & So Are Mosquitoes! Here's How You Can Prevent Mosquito Bites & Diseases Like Zika

It’s the first official week of Spring (aka Mosquito Season)! Time to start thinking about mosquito prevention.
The risk of contracting mosquito-borne Zika virus in the U.S. is at an all-time high, specifically dangerous for pregnant women or those trying to conceive as the virus can cause serious birth defects. According to the CDC, 222 cases of Zika were reported as of March 15, 2017, acquired through local mosquito-borne transmission in Florida and Texas. And because there’s currently no vaccine for Zika, the only way to prevent it is with mosquito bite prevention. Here’s how you can minimize your risk and limit the spread of Zika.

Home Mosquito Control

The best way to prevent mosquito bites when spending time outside this spring and summer is to reduce mosquito populations around your home with a mosquito control program. Usually consisting of monthly treatments, a professional mosquito control program includes:

  • Removal and/or reduction of mosquito resting and breeding sites – any areas that accumulate standing water like planters, toys, bird baths, pet bowls, containers, etc.
  • Larvicide treatments to mosquito breeding sites that cannot be removed, targeting mosquito larvae which inhibits maturity into adult mosquitoes
  • Adulticide treatments to mosquito resting sites – shaded areas, shrubbery, small trees, ivy, etc. – reducing the amount of adult mosquitoes around your home
  • Monthly inspections and recommendations on how to reduce mosquito breeding and resting areas

Other ways you can prevent mosquito bites:

  • Cover arms and legs when spending time outdoors with light, loose-fitting clothing
  • Keep mosquitoes out of your home by identifying entry points like broken, damaged, or missing window and door screens and make necessary repairs
  • Reduce mosquito breeding areas by eliminating any items inside that can accumulate standing water
  • Use EPA-registered insect repellents that contain DEET, picaridin, IR3535, oil of lemon eucalyptus or para-menthane-diol, or 2-undecanone

 

Spring is Here & So Are Mosquitoes! Here's How You Can Prevent Mosquito Bites & Diseases Like Zika

Spring is Here & So Are Mosquitoes! Here’s How You Can Prevent Mosquito Bites & Diseases Like Zika

It’s the first official week of Spring (aka Mosquito Season)! Time to start thinking about mosquito prevention.

The risk of contracting mosquito-borne Zika virus in the U.S. is at an all-time high, specifically dangerous for pregnant women or those trying to conceive as the virus can cause serious birth defects. According to the CDC, 222 cases of Zika were reported as of March 15, 2017, acquired through local mosquito-borne transmission in Florida and Texas. And because there’s currently no vaccine for Zika, the only way to prevent it is with mosquito bite prevention. Here’s how you can minimize your risk and limit the spread of Zika.

Home Mosquito Control

The best way to prevent mosquito bites when spending time outside this spring and summer is to reduce mosquito populations around your home with a mosquito control program. Usually consisting of monthly treatments, a professional mosquito control program includes:

  • Removal and/or reduction of mosquito resting and breeding sites – any areas that accumulate standing water like planters, toys, bird baths, pet bowls, containers, etc.
  • Larvicide treatments to mosquito breeding sites that cannot be removed, targeting mosquito larvae which inhibits maturity into adult mosquitoes
  • Adulticide treatments to mosquito resting sites – shaded areas, shrubbery, small trees, ivy, etc. – reducing the amount of adult mosquitoes around your home
  • Monthly inspections and recommendations on how to reduce mosquito breeding and resting areas

Other ways you can prevent mosquito bites:

  • Cover arms and legs when spending time outdoors with light, loose-fitting clothing
  • Keep mosquitoes out of your home by identifying entry points like broken, damaged, or missing window and door screens and make necessary repairs
  • Reduce mosquito breeding areas by eliminating any items inside that can accumulate standing water
  • Use EPA-registered insect repellents that contain DEET, picaridin, IR3535, oil of lemon eucalyptus or para-menthane-diol, or 2-undecanone

 

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