Millipedes are arthropods (not insects) that are commonly found in damp, moist locations. They feed on decaying organic matter. Millipedes will usually hide during the day and come out at night when the humidity is higher and dew is present on the ground. Millipedes are often mistaken for centipedes – they have elongated, worm-like bodies with 2 pairs of legs on each segment of their bodies. They are usually about 1 inch long with a hard, round, cylindrical body that is brown to black in color. When they are disturbed or dead they will curl into a spiral.

Finding a millipede in the house is not common. They cannot reproduce indoors and usually only come inside when there is a period of extreme wetness (during the rainy season) or in search of somewhere to overwinter (usually in late Fall). Millipedes are most commonly found in gardens but when they do come indoors they are usually found in the garage, basement, or the lowest level of the home. Millipedes that wander indoors typically die in a short amount of time because of the dryness.

If a millipede does get into your home, are they helpful or harmful? Should you be concerned? Millipedes are NOT harmful to humans. They do not feed on buildings, structures, or furnishings. They also cannot bite or sting. In fact, they can be beneficial in your compost pile as they help to break down the contents. They can cause damage to your garden by destroying seedlings or feeding on vegetables; however, there is no need to eliminate them unless they are causing damage to your plants.

While a millipede infestation is rare, there are things you can do to help prevent these pests from getting into your garden or home. Here are some tips on how to get rid of millipedes:

  • Eliminate moisture in garden areas where millipedes are often found or where their eggs can overwinter.
  • Rake out any old mulch under plants and replace it with either fresh mulch or straw.
  • Put piles of raked leaves into the compost pile away from your home or bag them for disposal.
  • Aerate your lawn to reduce thatch.
  • Move anything that could provide a habitat for millipedes away from your home (compost piles, firewood, stones).
  • Elevate any of these items that cannot be moved.
  • Install a band of gravel between foundations and flower beds.
  • Seal any cracks in the outside foundation.
  • Seal around the bottoms of doors and basement windows.
  • Use a dehumidifier to decrease the humidity in your home.
  • Water lawns in the morning so they can dry out by afternoon.
  • Contact a licensed pest control company who can inspect your home for entry points and help set up a comprehensive treatment and prevention plan.

 

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