What To Do If You Are Stung By A Yellow Jacket

Yellow jackets have barbed like pointers on their stinger that cause the stinger to get lodged into the skin.  The stinger is usually left behind, along with the venom sac.  It is important to remove a stinger as quickly as possible because venom can continue to be released even if it’s not attached to the bee.  The venom can cause an allergic reaction or a possible infection.

Source: Mayo Clinic

Source: Mayo Clinic

Symptoms of infection include:

  • redness
  • itchiness
  • swelling
  • continued pain in area of sting 3-5 afterwards
  • fever
  • chills

Consult your Doctor immediately if any of these symptoms occur.

Symptoms of an allergic reaction include:

  • swollen tongue and throat
  • wheezing
  • dizziness
  • short of breath
  • sudden drop in blood pressure

Consult your Doctor immediately at signs of an allergic reaction.

What to do if stung:

  • immediately remove stinger
  • wash the area with soap and water
  • apply a cold compress
  • apply a nonsteroidal anti-infammatory drug to reduce pain
  • apply an antihistamine or hydrocortisone ointment to reduce swelling, redness, and itchiness

It’s very important to call a pest professional if you believe a yellow jacket nest is near your property.  We DO NOT recommend you try to remove this on your own…this could result in being stung.

For yellow jacket removal, wasp removal, and hornet removal, call the professionals at Northwest Exterminating.

Other blogs: How to Treat a Yellow Jacket Sting

Source

Photo Source

 

Northwest Exterminating
830 Kennesaw Ave MariettaGA30060 USA 
 • 888-466-7849
 

WebMD’s Bad Bugs Slideshow

We know that bugs are gross and unsanitary but did you also know that they can be bad for our health.  WebMD discusses some of the worst bugs and the potential harm they can do to our health:

  • Ticks –Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, and allergic reactions.
  • Black Widow Spiders – Poisonous.
  • Brown Recluse Spiders – Poisonous, can cause serious wounds, infection, and in some cases can be deadly.
  • Head Lice – Itchiness can lead to infection, loss of hair.
  • Fleas – Itchiness can lead to infection.
  • Bee, Wasp, Hornet, Yellow Jacket – Painful sting, and can cause allergic reaction.
  • Fire Ants – Painful sting, venomous, red bumps that burn and itch, and can cause allergic reaction.
  • Chiggers – Itchy red welts.
  • Scabies – Itchiness, sores.
  • Bedbugs – Itchy, red bumps,  can develop infection from scratching, and can cause allergic reaction.
  • Puss Caterpillar – Poisonous, painful sting, rash, fever, vomiting, and muscle cramps.
  • Scorpions – Poisonous, painful, and can be deadly.
  • Deerflies – Infection, and Tularemia.
  • Mosquitoes – West Nile virus, dengue fever, other diseases, and scratching can cause skin infection.
  • Houseflies – Carries more than 1 million bacteria, intestinal infections by contaminating food.
  • Cockroaches – Salmonella and other diseases, dead carcasses can trigger allergic reactions and asthma.

Tips to prevent feeling the sting of these health issues:

  • Make sure your home is treated by a professional exterminator.  A professional can diagnose current problems, and prevent new issues from coming into your home efficiently and effectively.
  • Wear long clothing when outdoors.
  • Wear DEET repellant when outdoors.
  • Keep a clean, sanitary home and yard.  This will prevent insects from seeing your home as a place for them to call home.

For more information on these insects and their health hazards, visit WebMD: Bad Bugs Slideshow: Identifying Bugs and Their Bites.

 If you think you may have been bitten or stung by any of the insects above, please take note of  your body’s reaction and seek medical assistance immediately.

 

 

 

Technician Tales: Bees and the Not-So-Sweet Honey

The following story is the reason I decided to start bringing a camera with me on the job.  I didn’t want to miss any unique experiences like this one.
I showed up at the customer’s house on a rainy afternoon.  They had told our office staff that they had seen bees on the side of their home and had heard some buzzing in the wall.  At first glance it seemed pretty typical, bees entering the structure of the home and building a hive.  The customer asked me to look at something outside, she then pointed out a large mass in a tree in her neighbor’s yard.  I grabbed my binoculars to get a better look and I couldn’t believe what I saw.  Attached to the tree was a mass twice the size of a football and filled bees.  (After researching this phenomenon I discovered this is how they transfer the queen to a new hive.  All the workers gather around the queen to protect her while a select few special workers prepare the hive.)
The bees were entering the customers house through a small gap between the brick basement and the hardy plank siding.  By using a stethoscope, I was able to locate the exact location of the hive, the ceiling above their living room which was also the floor of the master bedroom.  I drilled into the ceiling and found honey on my drill which confirmed the hive location.
We began carefully cutting into the sheet rock to reveal the hive.  What we saw was truly nature at work.
Thousands of bees working together for one common purpose, to make honey!  The noise was deafening, the buzz of the bees filled the room, yet surprisingly they didn’t attack.
When bees are inside a home we remove them with a shop-vac.  We began to remove individual pieces of honeycomb and place them in garbage bags, we filled up 2 contractor sized bags each weighing about 30-40 lbs!  Once the honeycomb was removed, every ounce of wax and honey must be completely cleaned off, so we scraped and scrubbed to ensure the bees and other pests wouldn’t come back.
We sealed up the entry on the outside of the home and placed plastic around the opening to keep any left over bees from entering the living space of the home.  Success!  Hive removed, customer and family safe!
Matt Bowley
Inspection Specialist
404.446.8885 | callnorthwest.com
 

You Asked, We Answered: Winter Edition

Q:Why am I seeing pests like ants in my home in the middle of winter?

A: It has been a strange year. From a personal perspective, no snow and warmer than usual temperatures, have been very nice.  From a pest perspective, I fear we will be seeing some unusual pest movements this year. Recently we have had several wasp and bee complaints, ants are running wild and termite swarms have occurred. Setting us up for a very unusual spring and summer. Ants have been especially problematic because they usually are not around for awhile, but they’re back.

What do you do? First, keep areas clean, spills and dropped food can attract the ants from a distance. Pick up pet food and water, this can also act as an attractant. Watch for leaking hoses and garden or yard tools that are left wet after work, this attracts pests to the structure and could lead them inside. The best way to protect yourself is to have a professional exterminator your structure for entrances and give recommendations to reduce the potential hiding areas around your place.

 

Jerry Hatch
Technical Director
BCE CEHT CP-FS
LEED Green Associate

If you have a question about your pest control, ASK THE MOUSE!