Identify and Prevent Brown Recluse in Your Tennessee Home

Identify and Prevent Brown Recluse in Your Tennessee Home

Encountering spiders isn’t on everyone’s list of daily things to do. The good news is that the chance of encountering a spider that is harmful to you is slim, but it’s still possible.  A common one that you want to avoid is the brown recluse spider. How can you identify the brown recluse compared to other, less harmful varieties of brown spiders? Read below to learn more about these feared spiders and how you can prevent them!

Identifying a Brown Recluse

The brown recluse is ¼” to ¾” in size and some can grow larger in size. They are typically light to medium brown and have markings on their backs, with a black violin-like shape pointing to the rear of the spider.

Where Can a Brown Recluse be Found?

The brown recluse is known as a recluse for a reason; they don’t tend to make it known they are nearby. These spiders will typically seek out environments that are warm, dark, and dry.

This can include an array of places, such as:

  • Cellars
  • Attics
  • Basements
  • Inside inner tubes
  • Under or around rocks
  • Under tree bark
  • Utility boxes
  • Underneath or behind furniture

Why are They Feared?

Although not aggressive, they will bite when they feel trapped. Most people are bitten by a recluse when they unknowingly reach inside a shoe, piece of clothing, or a box. They will bite if they feel provoked, but their bite is the biggest reason why brown recluse spiders are so feared.

If you are bitten, it can take a few hours to notice its effects. When a brown recluse bites, it injects its venom, causing necrosis and an ulcerating sore. Once the venom takes effect, you may experience restlessness, insomnia, and fever. The sore can leave an open ulcer, even exposing the muscles or bone. If you think you have been bitten by a brown recluse, you should seek medical attention immediately.

If you encounter a brown recluse on your property, call your local pest control company to seek professional assistance. If you see one, it could mean an infestation is occurring.

Are Spiders Worse In The Summer?

Are Spiders Worse In The Summer?

Spiders are considered year-round pests, but they seem to come out in full force during the summer months. Some common spiders you may encounter this summer include wolf spiders, orb weavers, garden spiders, house spiders, brown recluse spiders, and black widow spiders. While most of these are harmless, brown recluses and black widows can be dangerous to humans with their venomous bites.

The spiders you see in the summer most likely aren’t just now making their way into your home; there’s a good chance they’ve already been hiding out inside for a while. They will commonly emerge in large numbers in the summer for two main reasons:

  • It’s mating season for male spiders
  • It’s peak season for most of their food sources (mosquitoes, flies, ants)

Seeing a spider here and there inside your home is usually nothing to worry about; they can sneak in through open windows, doors, etc. Seeing them in large numbers, however, can indicate a much bigger problem. Spider infestations can be the result of:

  1. Weather. Summer weather is ideal for spiders with warm temperatures, adequate shelter, etc. If the weather gets too hot, spiders will seek relief, often inside your home. The same thing applies if the summer is overly dry or overly wet. Your home provides the perfect place to hide out until conditions outdoors improve.
  2. Food. If food sources outdoors become scarce (due to weather or consistent pest control around your home), spiders may make their way indoors on their search for nutrition. Conversely, if you have an infestation of other household pests that spiders like to eat, they will also come inside to take advantage of the all-you-can-eat buffet.
  3. Water. Spiders must have water to survive. If outdoor water sources dry up (due to drought, etc.), they will go in search of hydration indoors.

Having a spider infestation in your home can leave you with webs everywhere, the risk of spider bites that can be painful and potentially dangerous, and the possibility of other pest infestations, as well. You can keep spiders out by:

  • Eliminating Entry Points. Spiders can access your home through the smallest cracks and crevices. Use weatherstripping around doors and windows and make sure it is kept in good repair. Caulk or seal any gaps, holes, and openings. Use screens on doors and windows and make sure they stay in good repair, as well.
  • Eliminating Hiding Places. Spiders prefer dark, undisturbed places to hide out (corners, cabinets, closets, storage containers, piles of paper or cardboard, and cluttered areas). Declutter your home and get rid of any old papers, magazines, newspapers, and boxes. Shake out anything you haven’t used in a while before using it. Vacuum and dust regularly, especially rooms and areas that you don’t use often. Outside, trim overgrown bushes, hedges, and trees. Keep grass mowed short and mow regularly. Get rid of trash and debris in your yard that spiders can use for shelter. Store firewood and lumber away from your home.
  • Eliminating Food Sources. Spiders eat other pests. Maintain routine pest control in and around your home with a professional pest control company. Eliminating other pests mean spiders will look for food elsewhere.

If you have a problem with spiders, contact your local pest control company for a thorough inspection and treatment plan.

 

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Spider Control for Spring

Spider Control for Spring

Although spiders are considered a year-round pest, they become more visible and active in the spring. Overwintering pests like spiders emerge as the weather warms up to lay eggs for the approaching season. Spiders are predators, preying on smaller insects for food. They are usually not a huge threat to humans with only a few venomous species in our area. In fact, they can be quite beneficial to have around your home, working as a form of natural pest control by eating other insects you may have around.

If the thought of sharing your home with spiders creeps you out, don’t fret! Here are some spider prevention tips you can use this spring to help keep these pests out.

  • Keep your outdoor lights off at night. Many bugs are attracted to light at night, providing a feast for spiders who are hanging around.
  • Keep vegetation trimmed and your lawn mowed. Overgrown bushes, grass, and other debris give spiders the ideal place to hide.
  • Don’t stack wood or install mulch to close to the sides of your home. Spiders will not only hide out in these places but will also use them as a bridge to crawl into your house.
  • Make sure trees, shrubs, and other landscaping aren’t touching your home. Spiders will also use these to get indoors.
  • Clean up food and crumbs immediately, both indoors and outdoors.
  • Get rid of stacks of old newspapers, magazines, etc.
  • Dust frequently and vacuum weekly.
  • Make sure windows and door screens are intact. Spiders will use holes and tears to get inside.
  • Get rid of cobwebs both indoors and outdoors. Spiders will use these to store food once they catch their prey.
  • Apply diatomaceous earth to your yard. This is a nontoxic option for outdoor pest control that is harmless to humans.
  • Consider natural remedies to prevent spiders. Some common methods include the use of mint, citrus, and vinegar.
  • Contact a professional. Spiders can be difficult to get rid of on your own. A professional pest control company can help identify the type of spider you are dealing with; where they may be hiding, nesting, or getting inside; and the most effective way to treat them in your home.

 

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What Is A Joro Spider?

What Is A Joro Spider?

The Joro spider, also known as Trichonephila clavata, is a member of the recognizable orb weaver family. These particular spiders are characterized by their large size (up to 3 inches in length with their legs extended) and yellow and blue-black striped backs with red undersides. Joro spiders are known for constructing large, wagon-wheel shaped webs that are a golden color. These webs can be several feet in length.

Joro spiders are native to Asia, particularly Japan, China, Korea, and Taiwan. In 2014, the first instance of the Joro spider in North America was confirmed in North Georgia. Subsequent sightings have been confirmed as far away as Greenville, South Carolina. It is unclear how and when these spiders first arrived here in Georgia but researchers believe they are here to stay. In fact, researchers have confirmed their presence in at least 25 counties in the state.

Joro spiders are not considered harmful to humans or pets. They will bite when provoked but are not considered a threat. Joros are beneficial to have around as they are one of the only species known to eat adult brown marmorated stinkbugs. They also help keep mosquito and other nuisance pest populations in check. Joro spiders do have predators in our area; both birds and wasps will eat them.

The jury is still out on whether or not there will be any long-term ramifications on local ecosystems. One thing all the researchers agree on is that the Joro spider is likely here to stay.

 

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Why Identifying Spiders is Important for Prevention

Why Identifying Spiders is Important for Prevention

Nothing says “Halloween” like spotting a few cobwebs around the house! While it’s always fun to see cobweb decorations during this time of year, it’s not as fun having to deal with them year-round. Since the temperatures have cooled off, many spiders are looking indoors to inhabit a warmer environment. It’s important to understand common types of spiders in order to provide the best treatment if they’ve infested your home.

Brown Recluse

The brown recluse spider is light to dark brown, with a signature brown violin shape on its backs. If threatened, these spiders will bite, which can be painful and leave an open sore. If bitten, some can experience fever, restlessness, and difficulty sleeping. Brown recluse spiders can be found in debris and woodpiles. If they’ve snuck inside your home, they can often be found under furniture, inside storage items, in baseboards, closets, and crawlspaces.

Wolf Spider

Wolf spiders are dark brown with paler stripes or markings and long, spiny legs. These spiders are large and hairy across their bodies. While these spiders will bite, it’s rare that they do and are not a significant threat to humans. Inside homes, wolf spiders tend to stay near or on the floor, especially along walls and under furniture where they chase their prey instead of capturing them in their webs. If outside, they like to inhabit firewood piles, leaves, yard debris, and stones.

Common House Spider

House spiders can vary in color but are usually yellow to brown with elongated abdomens. Although not a threat to humans, they are a nuisance to have in the home as they can produce and leave behind webs throughout the house. They can often be found in ceiling corners, under furniture, and inside closets, basements, garages, and crawlspaces. If outside, you will commonly find them spinning webs around windows, under eaves, and near light sources that attract food.

By recognizing each spider species and knowing where they most often inhabit, you can utilize the correct preventative measures to eliminate the chance of an infestation. Check out some of these easy do-it-yourself spider prevention tips:

  • Keep garages, attics, and basements clutter-free.
  • Avoid leaving clothes and shoes on the floor.
  • Seal any cracks and crevices around the home.
  • Call a professional pest control company. They will perform an inspection and provide you with the correct treatment and prevention plan for any spiders seen throughout your property.

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