Asian Tiger Mosquito

Asian Tiger Mosquito

 

If you are just now being able to absorb the menace of the Gallinipper mosquito, unfortunately you won’t be able to breathe easy just yet. Evidently, tourists aren’t the only people coming to our American shores this summer. The Asian tiger mosquito is named for the black-and-white stripes on its body.  You may think that spraying on some bug spray during the day time will help keep them at bay, but think again! This mosquito is different from others in that it bites all day long and pursues not only humans, but also dogs, cats, birds and other animals.

According to Livescience.com, entomology professor Dina Fonseca reports “Part of the reason it is called ‘tiger’ is also because it is very aggressive… you can try and swat it all you want, but once it’s on you, it doesn’t let go.” Another serious concern of this particular insect is that it spreads more than 20 diseases, including West Nile fever, dengue fever, yellow fever and two types of encephalitis.

Since the 1980s, the Asian tiger mosquito has reached 26 states, primarily in the eastern United States. Warm weather helps this pest get around, but its eggs are also capable of surviving cold weather. To help eliminate the potential destruction of this pest, it is important to remove standing water, wear insect repellent and wear long sleeves and pants outdoors. Naturally, Northwest Exterminating is equipped with preventive solutions to give you a mosquito-free summer. If you’re interested in our services, give us a call!

Sources:

http://www.livescience.com/37715-asian-tiger-mosquitoes-chikungunya.html

Northwest Exterminating
830 Kennesaw Ave MariettaGA30060 USA 
 • 888-466-7849
 

Weather & Insects

Everyone knows that warmer weather, mixed with a little rain and lots of sunshine makes for a spring full of bloom and growth. However, it may not be as common knowledge that, just like plants, insect population growth responds to certain types of weather, while being discouraged by some other weather patterns. In particular, temperature and moisture have quite an effect, especially during the warm and dry weather months of April, May, and June.

Temperature has such a significant effect because insects are poikilothermic, which means cold-blooded. Cold-blooded animals are unable to regulate their body temperature, so the environmental temperature affects their internal temperature. Certain insects develop rapidly when environment temperatures are in the 85-90 degree range. Development alone is not the only aspect of insect life affected by temperature, but also insect behavior such as flight, movement, reproduction and feeding. Extreme temperatures, whether very hot (> 120 degrees Fahrenheit) or extremely cold (< 32 degrees Fahrenheit) makes insect growth and behavior restricted and is often deadly.

Moisture is important in a way that most people don’t expect. Humidity itself affects insect development, because low humidity can make it difficult for an insect to regulate it’s water loss. Alternatively, too much moisture, such as excessive rainfall or winter storms, can damage insects. The amount of moisture in an insect’s environment is particularly important for those who depend on crops as their food supply. Cold, wet moisture extremes can also lead to disease, slow growth rates and disturb feeding patterns.

Source

Melissa Brown
mbrown@callnorthwest.com

 

The Art of Shrubbery

Do you wish your yard was landscaped by Edward Scissorhands?

You too can make statuesque shrub art by cropping your own bushes into shapes and other fascinating formations.

1- Pick the Right Shrub – Look for a shrub with a certain figure in mind because some hedges have similar features to the makeup of certain objects.

2 – Begin Shape Trimming – When you have an idea of what form you want your hedge trimmed into, you can start creating your work of art. At this phase you want a simple shape and no details. Make little snips instead of deep ones, all throughout the season.

3 – Wire Frames – You can also build any shape you prefer with the aid of galvanized wire. Manipulate the wire into the shape you will be smitten for and anchor it to your yard. Program the shrubs to advance over the wire and inward, cutting it back when needed.

4– Care – Bear in mind that your shrub art will need to be watered and possibly mulched. Cut the space around the hedge to get rid of any weeds, and use pest control if there is a threat.

Some shrubs have sharp thorns and/or sticky sap that can irritate the skin. Remember to wear long-sleeves, gloves and protective eyewear.

To truly enhance your beautiful new lawn, consider our tree and shrub program. Our experts will evaluate the trees and shrubs in and around your yard and develop a program to nourish, strengthen, and defend against diseases like rot and fungus, as well as control insect populations before they are allowed to cause damage. Call us today at 888-466-7849 or fill out the Free Lawn Analysis Form to schedule your Free Lawn Analysis at www.callnorthwest.com!

What kind of shapes or animals would you put in your hedges?

Cara Carver
ccarver@callnorthwest.com