September Pest of the Month: Stink Bugs

kudzu bug stink bug

Brief description:

The stink bug gets its name from its ability to release an odor when they are disturbed or crushed.  Stink bugs have a triangular or shield shape.

Habits:

  • Enter homes and other structures in the winter for shelter and emerge from their hiding spaces in early spring.
  • Mostly feed on plants and crops.
  • Some species feed off of other pests such as caterpillars and other crop damaging pests.  This species of stink bug is used as a natural pest control for crops.
  • When disturbed, they release a foul smelling fluid from their pores to protect themselves from predators.

Different species:

Threats:

  • Can damage plants and crops.
  • Invade homes in large numbers.

Prevention:

  • Seal cracks and crevices around the structure of your home so they cannot enter.
  • Do not shine outside lights directly onto your home…this will attract stink bugs to your home.
  • Use a vacuum to get rid of stink bugs.  Empty contents of vacuum into a tightly sealed trash bag and dispose of immediately.  Do NOT crush!  Crushing will cause them to emit their infamous odor.
  • Because of their ability to invade en masse, contact Northwest Exterminating if a stink bug infestation happens in your home or business.

Other pests to look out for:

Northwest Exterminating
830 Kennesaw Ave MariettaGA30060 USA 
 • 888-466-7849
 

Invasion of the Kudzu Bug

Due to the massive amount of calls that we have received lately regarding kudzu bugs, or stink bugs, we thought this earlier post would be beneficial!

In the past several weeks, our service centers have seen an emergence of kudzu bugs.  Kudzu bugs, also known as lablab bugs or globular bugs, have made their way to Georgia in recent years from Asia.  Thoughts are that because Atlanta has the “World’s Busiest Airport”, they could have arrived through Atlanta’s Hartsfield Jackson International Airport.  Since kudzu bugs are fairly new to experts, research is still being done on this particular bug.

Kudzu bugs look like brown lady bugs and eat what other than…kudzu.  But kudzu isn’t all that these bugs are feeding on.  Kudzu bugs also eat soybean plants.  More research is being done to find out if kudzu bugs will eat our Georgia crops as well.

The kudzu bug is an occasional invader, choosing to enter properties for the shelter and possibly needing moisture.  Think of them as the same as boxelder bugs, but with an increased amount of generations and smaller so they fit in tiny cracks and crevices. They are known to eat specific plants, but can survive on others.  They have 3 generations per year, so they can build up populations in great numbers, but once the population is reduced, control can be maintained.

Kudzu bugs have a notorious stench they emit when they feel threatened so it is suggested that if you come in contact with such bugs in your home or vehicle that you vacuum them up instead of squashing them.  It is highly recommended that you dispose of the vacuumed bugs so they do not continue to emit their stench.

For more information, check out the University of Georgia’s kudzu video:

University of Georgia – Kudzu Bug

Northwest Exterminating offers a treatment plan specifically for kudzu bugs.  Call us at 888.466.7849 for more information.

 

Kudzu Bugs

Do to the massive amount of calls that we have received lately regarding kudzu bugs, or stink bugs, we thought this earlier post would be beneficial!

In the past several weeks, our service centers have seen an emergence of kudzu bugs.  Kudzu bugs, also known as lablab bugs or globular bugs, have made their way to Georgia in recent years from Asia.  Thoughts are that because Atlanta has the “World’s Busiest Airport”, they could have arrived through Atlanta’s Hartsfield Jackson International Airport.  Since kudzu bugs are fairly new to experts, research is still being done on this particular bug.

Kudzu bugs look like brown lady bugs and eat what other than…kudzu.  But kudzu isn’t all that these bugs are feeding on.  Kudzu bugs also eat soybean plants.  More research is being done to find out if kudzu bugs will eat our Georgia crops as well.

The kudzu bug is an occasional invader, choosing to enter properties for the shelter and possibly needing moisture.  Think of them as the same as boxelder bugs, but with an increased amount of generations and smaller so they fit in tiny cracks and crevices. They are known to eat specific plants, but can survive on others.  They have 3 generations per year, so they can build up populations in great numbers, but once the population is reduced, control can be maintained.

Kudzu bugs have a notorious stench they emit when they feel threatened so it is suggested that if you come in contact with such bugs in your home or vehicle that you vacuum them up instead of squashing them.  It is highly recommended that you dispose of the vacuumed bugs so they do not continue to emit their stench.

For more information, check out the University of Georgia’s kudzu video:

University of Georgia – Kudzu Bug

Northwest Exterminating offers a treatment plan specifically for kudzu bugs.  Call us at 888.466.7849 for more information.