If you’ve been outside lately you’ve probably seen signs of spring – blooming flowers, pollen that aggravates our allergies, and lots of new insects buzzing around. Another thing that spring brings is swarms – of termites! Termites are present year round but their swarming season is during spring and early summer.

Termites cause billions of dollars in damage to homeowners each year. Here in the Southeast, subterranean termites are the most common types and are particularly destructive. These insatiable eaters can damage not only wooden structures, but have even been known to cause damage to brick and concrete homes as well. Termites can invade your home through cracks and holes as small as 1/32 of an inch!

Swarms are most common in spring and summer because they are triggered by warm, humid weather. Swarming marks the start of a new termite colony. Winged termites leave their nests when they become overcrowded and their isn’t enough food to sustain them. They then take flight and actually reproduce in mid-air. The females will then shed their wings and fall back to the ground. They then go in search of a new location to start their colonies.

Swarmers don’t usually cause any damage but once they establish their new colonies their offspring can cause significant damage – usually within 2 years. If you see flying termites it can signal one of two problems:

  1. There could be an existing termite problem nearby.
  2. Your home could potentially be at risk of a termite infestation when the swarm lands looking for a new place to colonize.

If you see winged termites inside your home this is a good indication that you already have an established termite colony inside or that there is existing damage already.

What can you do to prevent termites from coming into your home? Check out these tips to keep the termites out!

  • Have regular inspections done by a termite control company.
  • Do regular inspections of the outside of your home and the subfloor of your home checking for wood damage and the presence of mud tubes. (Mud tubes are pencil-sized tunnels located around termite nests, wood structures, and concrete or stone foundations.)
  • Repair any damaged roof tiles, soffits, and fascia on your home.
  • Keep mulch away from your foundation as this retains water and the moisture can attract termites.
  • Keep your basements, attics, and crawlspaces well ventilated and dry. Consider enclosing your crawlspace completely.
  • Make sure gutters are clear of debris and downspouts are working to make sure water is diverted away from your home. Consider installing gutter guards to help prevent clogs.

As always, if you suspect you have termites or find signs of damage, contact a termite control company who can come in and do a thorough inspection and set you up with a comprehensive treatment plan.

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